What Is The Meaning Of Human Existence?

One day back, I saw one youtube video. It’s identified with Existism, What are you all intuition about human existism. Since that video particularly fascinating, however, I’m not understanding the idea completely. In this way, please anybody explains the idea of Human Existence.

Welcome to the forum Mr. Chan. That’s a pretty broad topic. Did you mean existentialism? Existence just is. There is “solipsism” that says we might only think that we exist, but that is not a topic I don’t like anymore.

I tried looking up the word, came up with this.

From existism. org:

Given the rate of change of humanity it’s not crazy at all to say we could be at the turning point where bodily mortality, our genetic code, is cracked and aging a thing of the past. This is the puzzle one could only dream of. This is your chance to beat the buzzer, and cure all terrible ailments in the process. To be a pioneer that will always be known as one who helped get humanity there. One of the first.
"and aging a thing of the past."

How can aging be eliminated in a reality were time moves matter and life relentlessly forward?

 

I firmly believe that human existence can never be understood without first developing a deep understanding for Evolution and Deep-time as it unfolded he on this Earth that created us.

I have also found that in pursuit of learning about the Evolution of Earth, along with life and its creatures, those question get answered during moments of insight that resulted from one’s personal accumulating understanding - insights that would have been impossible with out the groundwork of learning to appreciate this planet that created us and that we will die back into.

 

Welcome to the forum Chan.

In this way, please anybody explains the idea of Human Existence.

Here's my attempt at describing my experience,
https://confrontingsciencecontrarians.blogspot.com/2020/02/accepting-fundamental-cosmic-truth.html

Also

Missing Key to Stephen Gould’s “Nonoverlapping Magisteria”. (SEPTEMBER 1, 2018, also at, ConfrontingScienceContrarians.blogspot.com)

Earth Centrist. Why it matters to me. (JUNE 1, 2019, ditto)


 

In my experience, no single answer to the meaning of human existence has been any more supported by facts, valid logic, and moral rightness than any other. And I’ve argued them all ad nauseam in various settings, academic and otherwise.

I am of the approach, therefore, that whatever meaning an individual life may have is determined, from within, by that individual.

I further operate on the belief that there is no “meaning” to the existence of any form of life, collectively.

YMMV.

 

What Is The Meaning Of Human Existence?

If that is the original question, then there is no meaning to human existence. We as humans have to make meaning for our existence.

I fully agree Mriana ! Human existence has no meaning per se, we give meaning to our own existence by our actions.

Thank you for replying to my post… Here I attached the video which was I forgot to share with you https://youtu.be/4miS4ZbVH18/.

In my experience, no single answer to the meaning of human existence has been any more supported by facts, valid logic, and moral rightness than any other. -- blue
I'll agree that no one has yet to come with a provable "meaning" and it's difficult to calculate how close we are to knowing any one of them is correct. However, the problem with throwing them all into a bucket and saying 'we just don't know', is what Francis Schaeffer (who had a strong influence on the current wave of evangelicalism) did. He reviewed the wisdom of the ages and said, 'see, none of it works', and concluded therefore, 'we have to use the Bible'.

I personally like what God, aka George Burns, said in response to the same question in the movie Oh God! It means exactly what you want it to mean. It doesn’t matter what I (god) think it means. If you haven’t seen the movie, it’s really a great movie, stuck in a 70’s vibe which is kinda fun regardless.

@lausten Professor Schaeffer, therefore, begins from the assumption that there needs to be a meaning to life assigned by an anachronistic social-cultural system since an over-arching one has not yet been identified by culture, nor will it likely be.

This, in my view, is a function of religion attempting to justify (rationalize?) and hold it’s territory where “explaining” life and the universe are concerned.

Which, to any thinking person, I might suggest, is not only breathtakingly patronizing but is predicated on the assumption that this “meaning” constitutes a life lived in fear, tribalism, superstition, and a slavish relationship to a supernatural being.

The meaninglessness of that mode of living should be self evident, in my humble opinion.

Seems we agree on that blue

 

@morgankane I fully agree Mriana ! Human existence has no meaning per se, we give meaning to our own existence by our actions.
Yup, in the end, it's up to each of us individually to decide for ourselves, how much or how little our life is to mean.

We might as well ask what the is the meaning of an ant. There is no meaning to any of it. Everything within the universe is merely an expression of physical probabilities of the mathematical potentials contained in the Table of Elements.

The Elements themselves are expressions of the combination of a set of elementary values (particles) , such as leptons, quarks and bosons.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Standard_Model_of_Elementary_Particles.svg

All physical objects are mathematical patterns of varying densities. Some patterns have emergent qualities such as H2O which may become expressed as a vapor, liquid, or solid, dependent on temperature.

The Universe itself has no intrinsic meaning, it is a three dimensional manifold, a self-ordered mathematical pattern which emerged from the original chaos of the cosmic inflation.

I have read a paper explaining that people who think that life and events must have a meaning are more prone to complotism.

Not a proof, but a correlation: a list of random numbers was submitted to a panel of test subjects and they were asked if this list had a logic, a sense. the ones who answered yes were more prone to believe complotist theories.

From Zelazny, Isle of dead, a very interesting book, a science-fiction novel

Life is a thing–if you’ll excuse a quick dab of philosophy before you know what kind of picture I’m painting–that reminds me quite a bit of the beaches around Tokyo Bay.

Now, it’s been centuries since I’ve seen that Bay and those beaches, so I could be off a bit. But I’m told that it hasn’t changed much, except for the condoms, from the way that I remember it.

I remember a terrible expanse of dirty water, brighter and perhaps cleaner way off in the distance, but smelling and slopping and chill close at hand, like Time when it wears away objects, delivers them, removes them. Tokyo Bay, on any given day, is likely to wash anything ashore. You name it, and it spits it up some time or other: a dead man, a shell that might be alabaster, rose and pumpkin bright, with a sinistral whorling, rising inevitably to the tip of a horn as innocent as the unicorn’s, a bottle with or without a note which you may or may not be able to read, a human foetus, a piece of very smooth wood with a nail hole in it–maybe a piece of the True Cross, I don’t know–and white pebbles and dark pebbles, fishes, empty dories, yards of cable, coral, seaweed, and those are pearls that were his eyes. Like that. You leave the thing alone, and after awhile it takes it away again. That’s how it operates. Oh yeah–it also used to be lousy with condoms, limp, almost transparent testimonies to the instinct to continue the species but not tonight, and sometimes they were painted with snappy designs or sayings and sometimes had a feather on the end. These are almost gone now, I hear, the way of the Edsel, the klepsydra and the button hook, shot down and punctured by the safety pill, which makes for larger mammaries, too, so who complains? Sometimes, as I’d walk along the beach in the sun-spanked morning, the chill breezes helping me to recover from the effects of rest and recuperation leave from a small and neatly contained war in Asia that had cost me a kid brother, sometimes then I would hear the shrieking of birds when there were no birds in sight. This added the element of mystery that made the comparison inevitable: life is a thing that reminds me quite a bit of the beaches around Tokyo Bay. Anything goes. Strange and unique things are being washed up all the time. I’m one of them and so are you. We spend some time on the beach, maybe side by side, and then that slopping, smelling, chilly thing rakes it with the liquid fingers of a crumbling hand and some of the things are gone again. The mysterious bird-cries are the open end of the human condition. The voices of the gods? Maybe. Finally, to nail all corners of the comparison to the wall before we leave the room, there are two things that caused me to put it there in the first place: sometimes, I suppose, things that are taken away might, by some capricious current, be returned to the beach. I’d never seen it happen before, but maybe I hadn’t waited around long enough. Also, you know, somebody could come along and pick up something he’d found there and take it away from the Bay.

up, in the end, it’s up to each of us individually to decide for ourselves, how much or how little our life is to mean. -- CC
We barely have the language yet to start this project. Write4U used the correct words "no intrinsic meaning". One of those words has 3 syllables and we've lost a few billion people at that point. A few billion more will move their hand and claim that proves they have free will.

It’s true that we “decide” what our life means, but we can only do that based on the definitions of “decide” and “meaning” that came out of the culture that developed out the slime mold that we came from. I skipped a couple steps in there, but this is an advanced audience.

lausten said; It’s true that we “decide” what our life means, but we can only do that based on the definitions of “decide” and “meaning” that came out of the culture that developed out the slime mold that we came from. I skipped a couple steps in there, but this is an advanced audience.
I completely agree.

I like Anil Seth’s hypothesis that all meaning we find in life stems from a basic survival instinct, which begins with the choice of “fight or flight”.

I see parallels in the meaning of greed, a peculiar human practice, stemming from an evolved hoarding instinct, which of course is also a basic survival strategy already practiced by termites and ants from hundreds of millions years ago.

Another wrinkle to add here is the question of why, at an individual level, we feel compelled to need to always have a purpose at all.

There has been more than one occasion in my own life where I definitely fell into the purposeless, directionless meat puppet category… and was fine with that and somehow didn’t feel as though I were failing at life or vanishing into the ether because of it. I admit I could be an outlier in this respect.

I think the existential ennui many feel who haven’t nailed down their “purpose” is a byproduct of believing that we need to be in a desperate search to satisfy an external idea of who we should be.

It may be written somewhere that all of us always have to be in this search for the meaning of our existence if isn’t already clear but I have yet to see it.

Meaning of Human Existence?

We are God’s toys.

:smiley:

One day he will tire of us and shake that Etch-A-Sketch and start over.

 

@bluecord35

I agree. Why does there have to be a purpose, or why do we have to know what the purpose is.

Akin to We really won’t ever know everything. Accept that, then go have fun formulating possibilities, but be prepared to change.