What's Missing From the Evil Debate?

I never liked using the word “evil” because it’s a cop out, as outlined in this article. It puts evil acts on a plane with natural disasters that we as humans have no control over and can do nothing to stop–not unlike hurricanes, tornadoes and climate change, apparently. One of the first words out of the mouths of conservative gun nuts after the killings in Las Vegas was “evil”–in other words, gun control can’t possibly stop it.
What’s missing from our ‘evil’ debate
By Daniel Burke, CNN Religion Editor
Updated 2:21 AM ET, Sun October 8, 2017
The day after the massacre in Las Vegas, President Donald Trump used the word “evil” three times during a brief speech at the White House.
He called the shootings an “act of pure evil,” said evil cannot shatter the country’s unity and urged Americans to pray for a day when “evil is banished.”
Many of Trump’s conservative Christian supporters praised his moral clarity. Evil is as evil does, they said, and if anything could be called evil, it is the senseless slaughter of people enjoying music on a Sunday night, unaware that a mass murderer loomed high above in a hotel suite.
A few Republicans took Trump’s line of reasoning further, arguing that evil cannot be “legislated away,” or even regulated. (Perhaps unwittingly, they echoed the liberal filmmaker Michael Moore, who says that “capitalism is evil, and you cannot regulate evil.”)
In any case, progressives pounced, calling the conservatives’ argument a cynical cop-out, a sop to the powerful gun lobby. The government regulates all kinds of evils, from murder to child abuse and arson. Just this week, House Republicans passed a bill that would outlaw late-term abortions, a practice that some Christians describe as “evil incarnate.” (The Catholic Church calls abortion “intrinsically evil.”)
But beneath the political debate lurk questions that seldom surface except in the aftermath of horrific events: What is evil? A malignant force, a moral category, or something else entirely? Where does evil come from? And what, if anything, can we do about it?
The questions seem clear enough, but as writers and thinkers of every age have found, evil eludes easy answers.
From myths to metaphysics
When Trump described the Las Vegas massacre as “pure evil,” he seemed to be saying that it came out of nowhere and was beyond anything we could comprehend, said Mark Larrimore, an associate professor of religion at the New School in New York.
“We have an impulse to use the strongest words we can find,” the professor said in an interview. “There’s something strangely consoling about calling something ‘evil.’ It puts a halo around the victims, and marks the event as not just another tragedy. It exists on another register, another moral plane.”
Still, as Larrimore notes in the “New Dictionary of the History of Ideas,” it’s often not enough to call something “evil.” We want to know why evil exists and find meaning in our suffering. And for that, we have often turned to religion.
Myths were among the earliest attempts to explain evil. The stories often ran something like this: God, or the gods, created the world, and it was good. Then humans came and mucked it up by making poor choices. It’s remarkable how often versions of that story appear, particularly in Western traditions, from Pandora’s box to the forbidden fruit.
cnn.com/2017/10/08/us/las-vegas-evil-debate/

I never liked using the word "evil" because it's a cop out, as outlined in this article. It puts evil acts on a plane with natural disasters that we as humans have no control over and can do nothing to stop--not unlike hurricanes, tornadoes and climate change, apparently. One of the first words out of the mouths of conservative gun nuts after the killings in Las Vegas was "evil"--in other words, gun control can't possibly stop it. What's missing from our 'evil' debate By Daniel Burke, CNN Religion Editor Updated 2:21 AM ET, Sun October 8, 2017 The day after the massacre in Las Vegas, President Donald Trump used the word "evil" three times during a brief speech at the White House. He called the shootings an "act of pure evil," said evil cannot shatter the country's unity and urged Americans to pray for a day when "evil is banished." Many of Trump's conservative Christian supporters praised his moral clarity. Evil is as evil does, they said, and if anything could be called evil, it is the senseless slaughter of people enjoying music on a Sunday night, unaware that a mass murderer loomed high above in a hotel suite. A few Republicans took Trump's line of reasoning further, arguing that evil cannot be "legislated away," or even regulated. (Perhaps unwittingly, they echoed the liberal filmmaker Michael Moore, who says that "capitalism is evil, and you cannot regulate evil.") In any case, progressives pounced, calling the conservatives' argument a cynical cop-out, a sop to the powerful gun lobby. The government regulates all kinds of evils, from murder to child abuse and arson. Just this week, House Republicans passed a bill that would outlaw late-term abortions, a practice that some Christians describe as "evil incarnate." (The Catholic Church calls abortion "intrinsically evil.") But beneath the political debate lurk questions that seldom surface except in the aftermath of horrific events: What is evil? A malignant force, a moral category, or something else entirely? Where does evil come from? And what, if anything, can we do about it? The questions seem clear enough, but as writers and thinkers of every age have found, evil eludes easy answers. From myths to metaphysics When Trump described the Las Vegas massacre as "pure evil," he seemed to be saying that it came out of nowhere and was beyond anything we could comprehend, said Mark Larrimore, an associate professor of religion at the New School in New York. "We have an impulse to use the strongest words we can find," the professor said in an interview. "There's something strangely consoling about calling something 'evil.' It puts a halo around the victims, and marks the event as not just another tragedy. It exists on another register, another moral plane." Still, as Larrimore notes in the "New Dictionary of the History of Ideas," it's often not enough to call something "evil." We want to know why evil exists and find meaning in our suffering. And for that, we have often turned to religion. Myths were among the earliest attempts to explain evil. The stories often ran something like this: God, or the gods, created the world, and it was good. Then humans came and mucked it up by making poor choices. It's remarkable how often versions of that story appear, particularly in Western traditions, from Pandora's box to the forbidden fruit. cnn.com/2017/10/08/us/las-vegas-evil-debate/
Is your "god" pure evil??
I never liked using the word "evil" because it's a cop out, as outlined in this article. It puts evil acts on a plane with natural disasters that we as humans have no control over and can do nothing to stop--not unlike hurricanes, tornadoes and climate change, apparently. One of the first words out of the mouths of conservative gun nuts after the killings in Las Vegas was "evil"--in other words, gun control can't possibly stop it. What's missing from our 'evil' debate By Daniel Burke, CNN Religion Editor Updated 2:21 AM ET, Sun October 8, 2017 The day after the massacre in Las Vegas, President Donald Trump used the word "evil" three times during a brief speech at the White House. He called the shootings an "act of pure evil," said evil cannot shatter the country's unity and urged Americans to pray for a day when "evil is banished." Many of Trump's conservative Christian supporters praised his moral clarity. Evil is as evil does, they said, and if anything could be called evil, it is the senseless slaughter of people enjoying music on a Sunday night, unaware that a mass murderer loomed high above in a hotel suite. A few Republicans took Trump's line of reasoning further, arguing that evil cannot be "legislated away," or even regulated. (Perhaps unwittingly, they echoed the liberal filmmaker Michael Moore, who says that "capitalism is evil, and you cannot regulate evil.") In any case, progressives pounced, calling the conservatives' argument a cynical cop-out, a sop to the powerful gun lobby. The government regulates all kinds of evils, from murder to child abuse and arson. Just this week, House Republicans passed a bill that would outlaw late-term abortions, a practice that some Christians describe as "evil incarnate." (The Catholic Church calls abortion "intrinsically evil.") But beneath the political debate lurk questions that seldom surface except in the aftermath of horrific events: What is evil? A malignant force, a moral category, or something else entirely? Where does evil come from? And what, if anything, can we do about it? The questions seem clear enough, but as writers and thinkers of every age have found, evil eludes easy answers. From myths to metaphysics When Trump described the Las Vegas massacre as "pure evil," he seemed to be saying that it came out of nowhere and was beyond anything we could comprehend, said Mark Larrimore, an associate professor of religion at the New School in New York. "We have an impulse to use the strongest words we can find," the professor said in an interview. "There's something strangely consoling about calling something 'evil.' It puts a halo around the victims, and marks the event as not just another tragedy. It exists on another register, another moral plane." Still, as Larrimore notes in the "New Dictionary of the History of Ideas," it's often not enough to call something "evil." We want to know why evil exists and find meaning in our suffering. And for that, we have often turned to religion. Myths were among the earliest attempts to explain evil. The stories often ran something like this: God, or the gods, created the world, and it was good. Then humans came and mucked it up by making poor choices. It's remarkable how often versions of that story appear, particularly in Western traditions, from Pandora's box to the forbidden fruit. cnn.com/2017/10/08/us/las-vegas-evil-debate/
Is your "god" pure evil?? I don't have a god. I am completely godless. A nonexistent god can be neither good nor bad. L
I never liked using the word "evil" because it's a cop out, as outlined in this article. It puts evil acts on a plane with natural disasters that we as humans have no control over and can do nothing to stop--not unlike hurricanes, tornadoes and climate change, apparently. One of the first words out of the mouths of conservative gun nuts after the killings in Las Vegas was "evil"--in other words, gun control can't possibly stop it. What's missing from our 'evil' debate By Daniel Burke, CNN Religion Editor Updated 2:21 AM ET, Sun October 8, 2017 The day after the massacre in Las Vegas, President Donald Trump used the word "evil" three times during a brief speech at the White House. He called the shootings an "act of pure evil," said evil cannot shatter the country's unity and urged Americans to pray for a day when "evil is banished." Many of Trump's conservative Christian supporters praised his moral clarity. Evil is as evil does, they said, and if anything could be called evil, it is the senseless slaughter of people enjoying music on a Sunday night, unaware that a mass murderer loomed high above in a hotel suite. A few Republicans took Trump's line of reasoning further, arguing that evil cannot be "legislated away," or even regulated. (Perhaps unwittingly, they echoed the liberal filmmaker Michael Moore, who says that "capitalism is evil, and you cannot regulate evil.") In any case, progressives pounced, calling the conservatives' argument a cynical cop-out, a sop to the powerful gun lobby. The government regulates all kinds of evils, from murder to child abuse and arson. Just this week, House Republicans passed a bill that would outlaw late-term abortions, a practice that some Christians describe as "evil incarnate." (The Catholic Church calls abortion "intrinsically evil.") But beneath the political debate lurk questions that seldom surface except in the aftermath of horrific events: What is evil? A malignant force, a moral category, or something else entirely? Where does evil come from? And what, if anything, can we do about it? The questions seem clear enough, but as writers and thinkers of every age have found, evil eludes easy answers. From myths to metaphysics When Trump described the Las Vegas massacre as "pure evil," he seemed to be saying that it came out of nowhere and was beyond anything we could comprehend, said Mark Larrimore, an associate professor of religion at the New School in New York. "We have an impulse to use the strongest words we can find," the professor said in an interview. "There's something strangely consoling about calling something 'evil.' It puts a halo around the victims, and marks the event as not just another tragedy. It exists on another register, another moral plane." Still, as Larrimore notes in the "New Dictionary of the History of Ideas," it's often not enough to call something "evil." We want to know why evil exists and find meaning in our suffering. And for that, we have often turned to religion. Myths were among the earliest attempts to explain evil. The stories often ran something like this: God, or the gods, created the world, and it was good. Then humans came and mucked it up by making poor choices. It's remarkable how often versions of that story appear, particularly in Western traditions, from Pandora's box to the forbidden fruit. cnn.com/2017/10/08/us/las-vegas-evil-debate/
Is your "god" pure evil?? I don't have a god. I am completely godless. A nonexistent god can be neither good nor bad. L Vegas was a manifestation of a deep sickness in Americas capitalist society. Trumps moronic statement that the killings in Las Vegas were “pure evil," explains nothing. It doesn’t even explain Trump himself, who gave a speech two weeks ago at the United Nations where he threatened to use nuclear weapons to incinerate the 27 million inhabitants of North Korea. Yet CNN, ever the sycophant, described his televised remarks on Las Vegas as “pitch perfect."
I never liked using the word "evil" because it's a cop out, as outlined in this article. It puts evil acts on a plane with natural disasters that we as humans have no control over and can do nothing to stop--not unlike hurricanes, tornadoes and climate change, apparently. One of the first words out of the mouths of conservative gun nuts after the killings in Las Vegas was "evil"--in other words, gun control can't possibly stop it. What's missing from our 'evil' debate By Daniel Burke, CNN Religion Editor Updated 2:21 AM ET, Sun October 8, 2017 The day after the massacre in Las Vegas, President Donald Trump used the word "evil" three times during a brief speech at the White House. He called the shootings an "act of pure evil," said evil cannot shatter the country's unity and urged Americans to pray for a day when "evil is banished." Many of Trump's conservative Christian supporters praised his moral clarity. Evil is as evil does, they said, and if anything could be called evil, it is the senseless slaughter of people enjoying music on a Sunday night, unaware that a mass murderer loomed high above in a hotel suite. A few Republicans took Trump's line of reasoning further, arguing that evil cannot be "legislated away," or even regulated. (Perhaps unwittingly, they echoed the liberal filmmaker Michael Moore, who says that "capitalism is evil, and you cannot regulate evil.") In any case, progressives pounced, calling the conservatives' argument a cynical cop-out, a sop to the powerful gun lobby. The government regulates all kinds of evils, from murder to child abuse and arson. Just this week, House Republicans passed a bill that would outlaw late-term abortions, a practice that some Christians describe as "evil incarnate." (The Catholic Church calls abortion "intrinsically evil.") But beneath the political debate lurk questions that seldom surface except in the aftermath of horrific events: What is evil? A malignant force, a moral category, or something else entirely? Where does evil come from? And what, if anything, can we do about it? The questions seem clear enough, but as writers and thinkers of every age have found, evil eludes easy answers. From myths to metaphysics When Trump described the Las Vegas massacre as "pure evil," he seemed to be saying that it came out of nowhere and was beyond anything we could comprehend, said Mark Larrimore, an associate professor of religion at the New School in New York. "We have an impulse to use the strongest words we can find," the professor said in an interview. "There's something strangely consoling about calling something 'evil.' It puts a halo around the victims, and marks the event as not just another tragedy. It exists on another register, another moral plane." Still, as Larrimore notes in the "New Dictionary of the History of Ideas," it's often not enough to call something "evil." We want to know why evil exists and find meaning in our suffering. And for that, we have often turned to religion. Myths were among the earliest attempts to explain evil. The stories often ran something like this: God, or the gods, created the world, and it was good. Then humans came and mucked it up by making poor choices. It's remarkable how often versions of that story appear, particularly in Western traditions, from Pandora's box to the forbidden fruit. cnn.com/2017/10/08/us/las-vegas-evil-debate/
Is your "god" pure evil?? I don't have a god. I am completely godless. A nonexistent god can be neither good nor bad. L Vegas was a manifestation of a deep sickness in Americas capitalist society. Trumps moronic statement that the killings in Las Vegas were “pure evil," explains nothing. It doesn’t even explain Trump himself, who gave a speech two weeks ago at the United Nations where he threatened to use nuclear weapons to incinerate the 27 million inhabitants of North Korea. Yet CNN, ever the sycophant, described his televised remarks on Las Vegas as “pitch perfect." You misunderstood what they meant was "pitch perfect". They meant his remarks were "pitch perfect" in describing his attitude toward humanity, war and morality--no defferent from Hitler's, Stalin's or Mussolini's "pitch perfect" statements. Spam line, spam line. XxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxXxxxx.
I never liked using the word "evil" because it's a cop out, as outlined in this article. It puts evil acts on a plane with natural disasters that we as humans have no control over and can do nothing to stop--not unlike hurricanes, tornadoes and climate change, apparently. One of the first words out of the mouths of conservative gun nuts after the killings in Las Vegas was "evil"--in other words, gun control can't possibly stop it. What's missing from our 'evil' debate By Daniel Burke, CNN Religion Editor Updated 2:21 AM ET, Sun October 8, 2017 The day after the massacre in Las Vegas, President Donald Trump used the word "evil" three times during a brief speech at the White House. He called the shootings an "act of pure evil," said evil cannot shatter the country's unity and urged Americans to pray for a day when "evil is banished." Many of Trump's conservative Christian supporters praised his moral clarity. Evil is as evil does, they said, and if anything could be called evil, it is the senseless slaughter of people enjoying music on a Sunday night, unaware that a mass murderer loomed high above in a hotel suite. A few Republicans took Trump's line of reasoning further, arguing that evil cannot be "legislated away," or even regulated. (Perhaps unwittingly, they echoed the liberal filmmaker Michael Moore, who says that "capitalism is evil, and you cannot regulate evil.") In any case, progressives pounced, calling the conservatives' argument a cynical cop-out, a sop to the powerful gun lobby. The government regulates all kinds of evils, from murder to child abuse and arson. Just this week, House Republicans passed a bill that would outlaw late-term abortions, a practice that some Christians describe as "evil incarnate." (The Catholic Church calls abortion "intrinsically evil.") But beneath the political debate lurk questions that seldom surface except in the aftermath of horrific events: What is evil? A malignant force, a moral category, or something else entirely? Where does evil come from? And what, if anything, can we do about it? The questions seem clear enough, but as writers and thinkers of every age have found, evil eludes easy answers. From myths to metaphysics When Trump described the Las Vegas massacre as "pure evil," he seemed to be saying that it came out of nowhere and was beyond anything we could comprehend, said Mark Larrimore, an associate professor of religion at the New School in New York. "We have an impulse to use the strongest words we can find," the professor said in an interview. "There's something strangely consoling about calling something 'evil.' It puts a halo around the victims, and marks the event as not just another tragedy. It exists on another register, another moral plane." Still, as Larrimore notes in the "New Dictionary of the History of Ideas," it's often not enough to call something "evil." We want to know why evil exists and find meaning in our suffering. And for that, we have often turned to religion. Myths were among the earliest attempts to explain evil. The stories often ran something like this: God, or the gods, created the world, and it was good. Then humans came and mucked it up by making poor choices. It's remarkable how often versions of that story appear, particularly in Western traditions, from Pandora's box to the forbidden fruit. cnn.com/2017/10/08/us/las-vegas-evil-debate/
Is your "god" pure evil?? I don't have a god. I am completely godless. A nonexistent god can be neither good nor bad. L Vegas was a manifestation of a deep sickness in Americas capitalist society. Trumps moronic statement that the killings in Las Vegas were “pure evil," explains nothing. It doesn’t even explain Trump himself, who gave a speech two weeks ago at the United Nations where he threatened to use nuclear weapons to incinerate the 27 million inhabitants of North Korea. Yet CNN, ever the sycophant, described his televised remarks on Las Vegas as “pitch perfect." You misunderstood what they meant was "pitch perfect". They meant his remarks were "pitch perfect" in describing his attitude toward humanity, war and morality--no defferent from Hitler's, Stalin's or Mussolini's "pitch perfect" statements. Spam line, spam lime. Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx. The MSM fell over themselves to support trump on this. Show me who denounced these remarks.
I never liked using the word "evil" because it's a cop out, as outlined in this article. It puts evil acts on a plane with natural disasters that we as humans have no control over and can do nothing to stop--not unlike hurricanes, tornadoes and climate change, apparently. One of the first words out of the mouths of conservative gun nuts after the killings in Las Vegas was "evil"--in other words, gun control can't possibly stop it. What's missing from our 'evil' debate By Daniel Burke, CNN Religion Editor Updated 2:21 AM ET, Sun October 8, 2017 The day after the massacre in Las Vegas, President Donald Trump used the word "evil" three times during a brief speech at the White House. He called the shootings an "act of pure evil," said evil cannot shatter the country's unity and urged Americans to pray for a day when "evil is banished." Many of Trump's conservative Christian supporters praised his moral clarity. Evil is as evil does, they said, and if anything could be called evil, it is the senseless slaughter of people enjoying music on a Sunday night, unaware that a mass murderer loomed high above in a hotel suite. A few Republicans took Trump's line of reasoning further, arguing that evil cannot be "legislated away," or even regulated. (Perhaps unwittingly, they echoed the liberal filmmaker Michael Moore, who says that "capitalism is evil, and you cannot regulate evil.") In any case, progressives pounced, calling the conservatives' argument a cynical cop-out, a sop to the powerful gun lobby. The government regulates all kinds of evils, from murder to child abuse and arson. Just this week, House Republicans passed a bill that would outlaw late-term abortions, a practice that some Christians describe as "evil incarnate." (The Catholic Church calls abortion "intrinsically evil.") But beneath the political debate lurk questions that seldom surface except in the aftermath of horrific events: What is evil? A malignant force, a moral category, or something else entirely? Where does evil come from? And what, if anything, can we do about it? The questions seem clear enough, but as writers and thinkers of every age have found, evil eludes easy answers. From myths to metaphysics When Trump described the Las Vegas massacre as "pure evil," he seemed to be saying that it came out of nowhere and was beyond anything we could comprehend, said Mark Larrimore, an associate professor of religion at the New School in New York. "We have an impulse to use the strongest words we can find," the professor said in an interview. "There's something strangely consoling about calling something 'evil.' It puts a halo around the victims, and marks the event as not just another tragedy. It exists on another register, another moral plane." Still, as Larrimore notes in the "New Dictionary of the History of Ideas," it's often not enough to call something "evil." We want to know why evil exists and find meaning in our suffering. And for that, we have often turned to religion. Myths were among the earliest attempts to explain evil. The stories often ran something like this: God, or the gods, created the world, and it was good. Then humans came and mucked it up by making poor choices. It's remarkable how often versions of that story appear, particularly in Western traditions, from Pandora's box to the forbidden fruit. cnn.com/2017/10/08/us/las-vegas-evil-debate/
Is your "god" pure evil?? I don't have a god. I am completely godless. A nonexistent god can be neither good nor bad. L Vegas was a manifestation of a deep sickness in Americas capitalist society. Trumps moronic statement that the killings in Las Vegas were “pure evil," explains nothing. It doesn’t even explain Trump himself, who gave a speech two weeks ago at the United Nations where he threatened to use nuclear weapons to incinerate the 27 million inhabitants of North Korea. Yet CNN, ever the sycophant, described his televised remarks on Las Vegas as “pitch perfect." You misunderstood what they meant was "pitch perfect". They meant his remarks were "pitch perfect" in describing his attitude toward humanity, war and morality--no defferent from Hitler's, Stalin's or Mussolini's "pitch perfect" statements. Spam line, spam lime. Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx. The MSM fell over themselves to support trump on this. Show me who denounced these remarks. Since when has the mainstream media supported Trump? To hear Trump tell it, the mainstream media is all fake news, so if they "fell all over themselves, it would be fake news, too. Lois
I never liked using the word "evil" because it's a cop out, as outlined in this article. It puts evil acts on a plane with natural disasters that we as humans have no control over and can do nothing to stop--not unlike hurricanes, tornadoes and climate change, apparently. One of the first words out of the mouths of conservative gun nuts after the killings in Las Vegas was "evil"--in other words, gun control can't possibly stop it. What's missing from our 'evil' debate By Daniel Burke, CNN Religion Editor Updated 2:21 AM ET, Sun October 8, 2017 The day after the massacre in Las Vegas, President Donald Trump used the word "evil" three times during a brief speech at the White House. He called the shootings an "act of pure evil," said evil cannot shatter the country's unity and urged Americans to pray for a day when "evil is banished." Many of Trump's conservative Christian supporters praised his moral clarity. Evil is as evil does, they said, and if anything could be called evil, it is the senseless slaughter of people enjoying music on a Sunday night, unaware that a mass murderer loomed high above in a hotel suite. A few Republicans took Trump's line of reasoning further, arguing that evil cannot be "legislated away," or even regulated. (Perhaps unwittingly, they echoed the liberal filmmaker Michael Moore, who says that "capitalism is evil, and you cannot regulate evil.") In any case, progressives pounced, calling the conservatives' argument a cynical cop-out, a sop to the powerful gun lobby. The government regulates all kinds of evils, from murder to child abuse and arson. Just this week, House Republicans passed a bill that would outlaw late-term abortions, a practice that some Christians describe as "evil incarnate." (The Catholic Church calls abortion "intrinsically evil.") But beneath the political debate lurk questions that seldom surface except in the aftermath of horrific events: What is evil? A malignant force, a moral category, or something else entirely? Where does evil come from? And what, if anything, can we do about it? The questions seem clear enough, but as writers and thinkers of every age have found, evil eludes easy answers. From myths to metaphysics When Trump described the Las Vegas massacre as "pure evil," he seemed to be saying that it came out of nowhere and was beyond anything we could comprehend, said Mark Larrimore, an associate professor of religion at the New School in New York. "We have an impulse to use the strongest words we can find," the professor said in an interview. "There's something strangely consoling about calling something 'evil.' It puts a halo around the victims, and marks the event as not just another tragedy. It exists on another register, another moral plane." Still, as Larrimore notes in the "New Dictionary of the History of Ideas," it's often not enough to call something "evil." We want to know why evil exists and find meaning in our suffering. And for that, we have often turned to religion. Myths were among the earliest attempts to explain evil. The stories often ran something like this: God, or the gods, created the world, and it was good. Then humans came and mucked it up by making poor choices. It's remarkable how often versions of that story appear, particularly in Western traditions, from Pandora's box to the forbidden fruit. cnn.com/2017/10/08/us/las-vegas-evil-debate/
Is your "god" pure evil?? I don't have a god. I am completely godless. A nonexistent god can be neither good nor bad. L Vegas was a manifestation of a deep sickness in Americas capitalist society. Trumps moronic statement that the killings in Las Vegas were “pure evil," explains nothing. It doesn’t even explain Trump himself, who gave a speech two weeks ago at the United Nations where he threatened to use nuclear weapons to incinerate the 27 million inhabitants of North Korea. Yet CNN, ever the sycophant, described his televised remarks on Las Vegas as “pitch perfect." You misunderstood what they meant was "pitch perfect". They meant his remarks were "pitch perfect" in describing his attitude toward humanity, war and morality--no defferent from Hitler's, Stalin's or Mussolini's "pitch perfect" statements. Spam line, spam lime. Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx. The MSM fell over themselves to support trump on this. Show me who denounced these remarks. Since when has the mainstream media supported Trump? To hear Trump tell it, the mainstream media is all fake news, so if they "fell all over themselves, it would be fake news, too. Lois when he is a war president doofus. Show me who denounced his words.
when he is a war president doofus. Show me who denounced his words.
Friggin' troll. "Show me people speaking against Trump". Should I also show you some false claims by shampoo commercials. Maybe show you what models look like in real life. Have you noticed the sky is blue, I could look up some pictures.
I never liked using the word "evil" because it's a cop out, as outlined in this article. It puts evil acts on a plane with natural disasters that we as humans have no control over and can do nothing to stop--not unlike hurricanes, tornadoes and climate change, apparently. One of the first words out of the mouths of conservative gun nuts after the killings in Las Vegas was "evil"--in other words, gun control can't possibly stop it. What's missing from our 'evil' debate By Daniel Burke, CNN Religion Editor Updated 2:21 AM ET, Sun October 8, 2017 The day after the massacre in Las Vegas, President Donald Trump used the word "evil" three times during a brief speech at the White House. He called the shootings an "act of pure evil," said evil cannot shatter the country's unity and urged Americans to pray for a day when "evil is banished." Many of Trump's conservative Christian supporters praised his moral clarity. Evil is as evil does, they said, and if anything could be called evil, it is the senseless slaughter of people enjoying music on a Sunday night, unaware that a mass murderer loomed high above in a hotel suite. A few Republicans took Trump's line of reasoning further, arguing that evil cannot be "legislated away," or even regulated. (Perhaps unwittingly, they echoed the liberal filmmaker Michael Moore, who says that "capitalism is evil, and you cannot regulate evil.") In any case, progressives pounced, calling the conservatives' argument a cynical cop-out, a sop to the powerful gun lobby. The government regulates all kinds of evils, from murder to child abuse and arson. Just this week, House Republicans passed a bill that would outlaw late-term abortions, a practice that some Christians describe as "evil incarnate." (The Catholic Church calls abortion "intrinsically evil.") But beneath the political debate lurk questions that seldom surface except in the aftermath of horrific events: What is evil? A malignant force, a moral category, or something else entirely? Where does evil come from? And what, if anything, can we do about it? The questions seem clear enough, but as writers and thinkers of every age have found, evil eludes easy answers. From myths to metaphysics When Trump described the Las Vegas massacre as "pure evil," he seemed to be saying that it came out of nowhere and was beyond anything we could comprehend, said Mark Larrimore, an associate professor of religion at the New School in New York. "We have an impulse to use the strongest words we can find," the professor said in an interview. "There's something strangely consoling about calling something 'evil.' It puts a halo around the victims, and marks the event as not just another tragedy. It exists on another register, another moral plane." Still, as Larrimore notes in the "New Dictionary of the History of Ideas," it's often not enough to call something "evil." We want to know why evil exists and find meaning in our suffering. And for that, we have often turned to religion. Myths were among the earliest attempts to explain evil. The stories often ran something like this: God, or the gods, created the world, and it was good. Then humans came and mucked it up by making poor choices. It's remarkable how often versions of that story appear, particularly in Western traditions, from Pandora's box to the forbidden fruit. cnn.com/2017/10/08/us/las-vegas-evil-debate/
Is your "god" pure evil?? I don't have a god. I am completely godless. A nonexistent god can be neither good nor bad. L Vegas was a manifestation of a deep sickness in Americas capitalist society. Trumps moronic statement that the killings in Las Vegas were “pure evil," explains nothing. It doesn’t even explain Trump himself, who gave a speech two weeks ago at the United Nations where he threatened to use nuclear weapons to incinerate the 27 million inhabitants of North Korea. Yet CNN, ever the sycophant, described his televised remarks on Las Vegas as “pitch perfect." You misunderstood what they meant was "pitch perfect". They meant his remarks were "pitch perfect" in describing his attitude toward humanity, war and morality--no defferent from Hitler's, Stalin's or Mussolini's "pitch perfect" statements. Spam line, spam lime. Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx. The MSM fell over themselves to support trump on this. Show me who denounced these remarks. Since when has the mainstream media supported Trump? To hear Trump tell it, the mainstream media is all fake news, so if they "fell all over themselves, it would be fake news, too. Lois when he is a war president doofus. Show me who denounced his words. Everybody with an IQ over 50.
I never liked using the word "evil" because it's a cop out, as outlined in this article. It puts evil acts on a plane with natural disasters that we as humans have no control over and can do nothing to stop--not unlike hurricanes, tornadoes and climate change, apparently. One of the first words out of the mouths of conservative gun nuts after the killings in Las Vegas was "evil"--in other words, gun control can't possibly stop it. What's missing from our 'evil' debate By Daniel Burke, CNN Religion Editor Updated 2:21 AM ET, Sun October 8, 2017 The day after the massacre in Las Vegas, President Donald Trump used the word "evil" three times during a brief speech at the White House. He called the shootings an "act of pure evil," said evil cannot shatter the country's unity and urged Americans to pray for a day when "evil is banished." Many of Trump's conservative Christian supporters praised his moral clarity. Evil is as evil does, they said, and if anything could be called evil, it is the senseless slaughter of people enjoying music on a Sunday night, unaware that a mass murderer loomed high above in a hotel suite. A few Republicans took Trump's line of reasoning further, arguing that evil cannot be "legislated away," or even regulated. (Perhaps unwittingly, they echoed the liberal filmmaker Michael Moore, who says that "capitalism is evil, and you cannot regulate evil.") In any case, progressives pounced, calling the conservatives' argument a cynical cop-out, a sop to the powerful gun lobby. The government regulates all kinds of evils, from murder to child abuse and arson. Just this week, House Republicans passed a bill that would outlaw late-term abortions, a practice that some Christians describe as "evil incarnate." (The Catholic Church calls abortion "intrinsically evil.") But beneath the political debate lurk questions that seldom surface except in the aftermath of horrific events: What is evil? A malignant force, a moral category, or something else entirely? Where does evil come from? And what, if anything, can we do about it? The questions seem clear enough, but as writers and thinkers of every age have found, evil eludes easy answers. From myths to metaphysics When Trump described the Las Vegas massacre as "pure evil," he seemed to be saying that it came out of nowhere and was beyond anything we could comprehend, said Mark Larrimore, an associate professor of religion at the New School in New York. "We have an impulse to use the strongest words we can find," the professor said in an interview. "There's something strangely consoling about calling something 'evil.' It puts a halo around the victims, and marks the event as not just another tragedy. It exists on another register, another moral plane." Still, as Larrimore notes in the "New Dictionary of the History of Ideas," it's often not enough to call something "evil." We want to know why evil exists and find meaning in our suffering. And for that, we have often turned to religion. Myths were among the earliest attempts to explain evil. The stories often ran something like this: God, or the gods, created the world, and it was good. Then humans came and mucked it up by making poor choices. It's remarkable how often versions of that story appear, particularly in Western traditions, from Pandora's box to the forbidden fruit. cnn.com/2017/10/08/us/las-vegas-evil-debate/
Is your "god" pure evil?? I don't have a god. I am completely godless. A nonexistent god can be neither good nor bad. L Vegas was a manifestation of a deep sickness in Americas capitalist society. Trumps moronic statement that the killings in Las Vegas were “pure evil," explains nothing. It doesn’t even explain Trump himself, who gave a speech two weeks ago at the United Nations where he threatened to use nuclear weapons to incinerate the 27 million inhabitants of North Korea. Yet CNN, ever the sycophant, described his televised remarks on Las Vegas as “pitch perfect." You misunderstood what they meant was "pitch perfect". They meant his remarks were "pitch perfect" in describing his attitude toward humanity, war and morality--no defferent from Hitler's, Stalin's or Mussolini's "pitch perfect" statements. Spam line, spam lime. Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx. The MSM fell over themselves to support trump on this. Show me who denounced these remarks. Since when has the mainstream media supported Trump? To hear Trump tell it, the mainstream media is all fake news, so if they "fell all over themselves, it would be fake news, too. Lois when he is a war president doofus. Show me who denounced his words. Everybody with an IQ over 50. A big dodge. Show me who in the media dennounced his threats to North Korea.
A big dodge. Show me who in the media dennounced his threats to North Korea.
https://www.wired.com/story/donald-trump-united-nations-north-korea/ https://www.vox.com/world/2017/9/20/16340392/trump-north-korea-unga-totally-destroy-speech https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/russia-calls-trumps-korea-remarks-a-dangerous-step-toward-instability/2017/09/19/1a6d9b56-9d69-11e7-b2a7-bc70b6f98089_story.html?utm_term=.63d12077d285 http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/politics/ct-russia-trump-north-korea-20170919-story.html http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/hillary-clinton-trump-un-speech-north-korea-totally-destroy-general-assembly-nuclear-weapons-a7957086.html https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2017/09/preemption-prevention-north-korea/541098/
I never liked using the word "evil" because it's a cop out, as outlined in this article. It puts evil acts on a plane with natural disasters that we as humans have no control over and can do nothing to stop--not unlike hurricanes, tornadoes and climate change, apparently. One of the first words out of the mouths of conservative gun nuts after the killings in Las Vegas was "evil"--in other words, gun control can't possibly stop it. What's missing from our 'evil' debate By Daniel Burke, CNN Religion Editor Updated 2:21 AM ET, Sun October 8, 2017 The day after the massacre in Las Vegas, President Donald Trump used the word "evil" three times during a brief speech at the White House. He called the shootings an "act of pure evil," said evil cannot shatter the country's unity and urged Americans to pray for a day when "evil is banished." Many of Trump's conservative Christian supporters praised his moral clarity. Evil is as evil does, they said, and if anything could be called evil, it is the senseless slaughter of people enjoying music on a Sunday night, unaware that a mass murderer loomed high above in a hotel suite. A few Republicans took Trump's line of reasoning further, arguing that evil cannot be "legislated away," or even regulated. (Perhaps unwittingly, they echoed the liberal filmmaker Michael Moore, who says that "capitalism is evil, and you cannot regulate evil.") In any case, progressives pounced, calling the conservatives' argument a cynical cop-out, a sop to the powerful gun lobby. The government regulates all kinds of evils, from murder to child abuse and arson. Just this week, House Republicans passed a bill that would outlaw late-term abortions, a practice that some Christians describe as "evil incarnate." (The Catholic Church calls abortion "intrinsically evil.") But beneath the political debate lurk questions that seldom surface except in the aftermath of horrific events: What is evil? A malignant force, a moral category, or something else entirely? Where does evil come from? And what, if anything, can we do about it? The questions seem clear enough, but as writers and thinkers of every age have found, evil eludes easy answers. From myths to metaphysics When Trump described the Las Vegas massacre as "pure evil," he seemed to be saying that it came out of nowhere and was beyond anything we could comprehend, said Mark Larrimore, an associate professor of religion at the New School in New York. "We have an impulse to use the strongest words we can find," the professor said in an interview. "There's something strangely consoling about calling something 'evil.' It puts a halo around the victims, and marks the event as not just another tragedy. It exists on another register, another moral plane." Still, as Larrimore notes in the "New Dictionary of the History of Ideas," it's often not enough to call something "evil." We want to know why evil exists and find meaning in our suffering. And for that, we have often turned to religion. Myths were among the earliest attempts to explain evil. The stories often ran something like this: God, or the gods, created the world, and it was good. Then humans came and mucked it up by making poor choices. It's remarkable how often versions of that story appear, particularly in Western traditions, from Pandora's box to the forbidden fruit. cnn.com/2017/10/08/us/las-vegas-evil-debate/
Is your "god" pure evil?? I don't have a god. I am completely godless. A nonexistent god can be neither good nor bad. L Vegas was a manifestation of a deep sickness in Americas capitalist society. Trumps moronic statement that the killings in Las Vegas were “pure evil," explains nothing. It doesn’t even explain Trump himself, who gave a speech two weeks ago at the United Nations where he threatened to use nuclear weapons to incinerate the 27 million inhabitants of North Korea. Yet CNN, ever the sycophant, described his televised remarks on Las Vegas as “pitch perfect." You misunderstood what they meant was "pitch perfect". They meant his remarks were "pitch perfect" in describing his attitude toward humanity, war and morality--no defferent from Hitler's, Stalin's or Mussolini's "pitch perfect" statements. Spam line, spam lime. Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx. The MSM fell over themselves to support trump on this. Show me who denounced these remarks. Since when has the mainstream media supported Trump? To hear Trump tell it, the mainstream media is all fake news, so if they "fell all over themselves, it would be fake news, too. Lois when he is a war president doofus. Show me who denounced his words. Everybody with an IQ over 50. A big dodge. Show me who in the media dennounced his threats to North Korea. I shouldn't have to do your research for you. Trump tweets threats to North Korea after UN speech by rogue nation's foreign minister https://www.cnbc.com/2017/09/24/trump-tweets-threats-to-north-korea-after-un-speech-by-rogue-nations-foreign-minister.html North Korea Says Trump's Latest Threat Is a 'Declaration of War' http://time.com/4955880/donald-trump-north-korea-tweet-war/ Tracking Trump: trading threats as tension builds with North Korea https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/sep/23/tracking-trump-north-korea-un-threats North Korea: Strategies to Resolve the Nuclear Threat http://www.washingtontimes.com/specials/north-korea-strategies-resolve-nuclear-threat/?gclid=CjwKCAjw3_HOBRBaEiwAvLBbopdHBX6lZWtN-9Dw-ERhvLhT30kwe_1CQFCCoHfjEPMK4LnqLc_ZbRoCreoQAvD_BwE Imagine If Trump’s Twitter Threats to North Korea Were Twice As Long http://fortune.com/2017/09/29/donald-trump-twitter-tweets-280-characters/ U.S. beefs up North Korea sanctions; Kim Jong Un warns Trump will 'pay dearly' http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-trump-north-korea-sanctions-20170921-story.html
I never liked using the word "evil" because it's a cop out, as outlined in this article. It puts evil acts on a plane with natural disasters that we as humans have no control over and can do nothing to stop--not unlike hurricanes, tornadoes and climate change, apparently. One of the first words out of the mouths of conservative gun nuts after the killings in Las Vegas was "evil"--in other words, gun control can't possibly stop it. What's missing from our 'evil' debate By Daniel Burke, CNN Religion Editor Updated 2:21 AM ET, Sun October 8, 2017 The day after the massacre in Las Vegas, President Donald Trump used the word "evil" three times during a brief speech at the White House. He called the shootings an "act of pure evil," said evil cannot shatter the country's unity and urged Americans to pray for a day when "evil is banished." Many of Trump's conservative Christian supporters praised his moral clarity. Evil is as evil does, they said, and if anything could be called evil, it is the senseless slaughter of people enjoying music on a Sunday night, unaware that a mass murderer loomed high above in a hotel suite. A few Republicans took Trump's line of reasoning further, arguing that evil cannot be "legislated away," or even regulated. (Perhaps unwittingly, they echoed the liberal filmmaker Michael Moore, who says that "capitalism is evil, and you cannot regulate evil.") In any case, progressives pounced, calling the conservatives' argument a cynical cop-out, a sop to the powerful gun lobby. The government regulates all kinds of evils, from murder to child abuse and arson. Just this week, House Republicans passed a bill that would outlaw late-term abortions, a practice that some Christians describe as "evil incarnate." (The Catholic Church calls abortion "intrinsically evil.") But beneath the political debate lurk questions that seldom surface except in the aftermath of horrific events: What is evil? A malignant force, a moral category, or something else entirely? Where does evil come from? And what, if anything, can we do about it? The questions seem clear enough, but as writers and thinkers of every age have found, evil eludes easy answers. From myths to metaphysics When Trump described the Las Vegas massacre as "pure evil," he seemed to be saying that it came out of nowhere and was beyond anything we could comprehend, said Mark Larrimore, an associate professor of religion at the New School in New York. "We have an impulse to use the strongest words we can find," the professor said in an interview. "There's something strangely consoling about calling something 'evil.' It puts a halo around the victims, and marks the event as not just another tragedy. It exists on another register, another moral plane." Still, as Larrimore notes in the "New Dictionary of the History of Ideas," it's often not enough to call something "evil." We want to know why evil exists and find meaning in our suffering. And for that, we have often turned to religion. Myths were among the earliest attempts to explain evil. The stories often ran something like this: God, or the gods, created the world, and it was good. Then humans came and mucked it up by making poor choices. It's remarkable how often versions of that story appear, particularly in Western traditions, from Pandora's box to the forbidden fruit. cnn.com/2017/10/08/us/las-vegas-evil-debate/
Is your "god" pure evil?? I don't have a god. I am completely godless. A nonexistent god can be neither good nor bad. L Vegas was a manifestation of a deep sickness in Americas capitalist society. Trumps moronic statement that the killings in Las Vegas were “pure evil," explains nothing. It doesn’t even explain Trump himself, who gave a speech two weeks ago at the United Nations where he threatened to use nuclear weapons to incinerate the 27 million inhabitants of North Korea. Yet CNN, ever the sycophant, described his televised remarks on Las Vegas as “pitch perfect." You misunderstood what they meant was "pitch perfect". They meant his remarks were "pitch perfect" in describing his attitude toward humanity, war and morality--no defferent from Hitler's, Stalin's or Mussolini's "pitch perfect" statements. Spam line, spam lime. Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx. The MSM fell over themselves to support trump on this. Show me who denounced these remarks. Since when has the mainstream media supported Trump? To hear Trump tell it, the mainstream media is all fake news, so if they "fell all over themselves, it would be fake news, too. Lois when he is a war president doofus. Show me who denounced his words. Everybody with an IQ over 50. A big dodge. Show me who in the media dennounced his threats to North Korea. I shouldn't have to do your research for you. Trump tweets threats to North Korea after UN speech by rogue nation's foreign minister https://www.cnbc.com/2017/09/24/trump-tweets-threats-to-north-korea-after-un-speech-by-rogue-nations-foreign-minister.html North Korea Says Trump's Latest Threat Is a 'Declaration of War' http://time.com/4955880/donald-trump-north-korea-tweet-war/ Tracking Trump: trading threats as tension builds with North Korea https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/sep/23/tracking-trump-north-korea-un-threats North Korea: Strategies to Resolve the Nuclear Threat http://www.washingtontimes.com/specials/north-korea-strategies-resolve-nuclear-threat/?gclid=CjwKCAjw3_HOBRBaEiwAvLBbopdHBX6lZWtN-9Dw-ERhvLhT30kwe_1CQFCCoHfjEPMK4LnqLc_ZbRoCreoQAvD_BwE Imagine If Trump’s Twitter Threats to North Korea Were Twice As Long http://fortune.com/2017/09/29/donald-trump-twitter-tweets-280-characters/ U.S. beefs up North Korea sanctions; Kim Jong Un warns Trump will 'pay dearly' http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-trump-north-korea-sanctions-20170921-story.html Are you serious? Not one discusses or makes an effort to educate inform the public of the consequences of trumps threats. Not one mentions the illegalities of such action with international law. Not one speaks of trumps actions in terms of war crimes. Not one is willing to provide north Korea’s side of the story and the fact that a preemptive strike from their end would be legal justified in context of the US threats of annihilation. All articles you reference are in compliance with military action and make no effort to halt the drive to war.
Are you serious? Not one discusses or makes an effort to educate inform the public of the consequences of trumps threats. Not one mentions the illegalities of such action with international law. Not one speaks of trumps actions in terms of war crimes. Not one is willing to provide north Korea’s side of the story and the fact that a preemptive strike from their end would be legal justified in context of the US threats of annihilation. All articles you reference are in compliance with military action and make no effort to halt the drive to war.
What a surprise, we give him what he asks for and then he changes what he asked for. You asked for media examples. The news doesn't normally do the things you are asking for here. What war crimes are you talking about anyway? It is not the news media's job to prosecute a President, but some of them have brought on people to discuss the subject. And I think you should be brought up on charges yourself, for suggesting a preemptive nuclear strike is justified.
Are you serious? Not one discusses or makes an effort to educate inform the public of the consequences of trumps threats. Not one mentions the illegalities of such action with international law. Not one speaks of trumps actions in terms of war crimes. Not one is willing to provide north Korea’s side of the story and the fact that a preemptive strike from their end would be legal justified in context of the US threats of annihilation. All articles you reference are in compliance with military action and make no effort to halt the drive to war.
What a surprise, we give him what he asks for and then he changes what he asked for. You asked for media examples. The news doesn't normally do the things you are asking for here. What war crimes are you talking about anyway? It is not the news media's job to prosecute a President, but some of them have brought on people to discuss the subject. And I think you should be brought up on charges yourself, for suggesting a preemptive nuclear strike is justified.your country justified preemptive strike for Iraq. I asked for media examples that denounced trump threats to North Korea. Are you dyslexic??
your country justified preemptive strike for Iraq. I asked for media examples that denounced trump threats to North Korea. Are you dyslexic??
What my country does and what I believe are two different things. Do you know what dyslexic means?
your country justified preemptive strike for Iraq. I asked for media examples that denounced trump threats to North Korea. Are you dyslexic??
What my country does and what I believe are two different things. Do you know what dyslexic means? Yes from the quality of your responses here

Getting back on topic, I doubt anything is missing from the debate.
Evil simply means very bad. That is how most people understand it and that’s why it’s used to describe a massacre. Burke’s attempt to portray this as some metaphysical stratagy to discourage action on gun control is retarded.

Getting back on topic, I doubt anything is missing from the debate. Evil simply means very bad. That is how most people understand it and that's why it's used to describe a massacre. Burke's attempt to portray this as some metaphysical stratagy to discourage action on gun control is retarded.
All comes back to well being. The consequences of your actions to the well being of others. With regards to Capitalism, externalities must not be considered