More of the Same

Looks like another black idiot is dead after failing to restrain himself during what could have been a simple traffic stop.

A police officer fatally shot a Black man, identified as Daunte Wright, after he was pulled over in a Minneapolis suburb Sunday, leading to clashes between protesters and law enforcement.

Police said the incident occurred just before 2 p.m. Sunday. After Wright was pulled over, police determined there was an outstanding warrant for him. When they tried to arrest him, he got back in his vehicle, and the officer fired at Wright. Police said his vehicle traveled several blocks before hitting another one.


Ironically this happened not far from where George Floyd was killed

There is something much different in this incident as the cop meant to reach for her taser but grabbed her gun instead. Cue jokes about female cops.

</iframe><p>via GIPHY</p>" alt="" />

I kid, but this is a rare incident where the victim and the cop were both equally incredibly stupid.

There have been other incidents when cops mistakenly grabbed their gun instead of the taser.

I tend to agree about trying to resist arrest is not smart - aka “Haven’t they seen the news?”

But then again, my race doesn’t have the tragic historical interaction with cops.

 

 

@thatoneguy Mind how you phrase some things and keep to the facts or I’ll shut the thread down. The use of “black idiot” is not civil verbiage.

That said, it was the cop who was the idiot because she [allegedly] confused which was her gun and which was the taser. I don’t believe her. How the heck does a cop confused something like that? IMO she was probably afraid of the black man, because he was black and a man. I don’t believe for a minute she was confused about that. If she was, then she needs to go through more training.

Cue jokes about female cops.

The warning also goes for this too, because of the same reason. Racism and sexism. You’re batting a thousand right out of the gate, @thatoneguy.

I don’t believe for a minute she was confused about that. If she was, then she needs to go through more training.
Kind of like Chauvin being distracted by the crowd ... it's their job not to be intimidated, distracted or confused.

I can believe she made a mistake, but she was pretty quick to draw the weapon and pull the trigger.

But in the end, WE still get tickets and fines and charged for making mistakes.

Maybe they need to re-design tasers.

 

@mrmhead

it’s their job not to be intimidated, distracted or confused.

Exactly! They are suppose to be trained to not easily be intimidated or confused or what have you. If she can’t tell the difference as to what goes where on her belt, she really needs more training and even my son thinks the police need more training than what they get. The person she shot isn’t all at fault for what happened. She bares some of the responsibility too.

Thanks Mriana. I get numb to oneguy. I forget about new and potential members who don’t know he is not worth arguing with most of the time.

 

To the incident. Not only is the “confused” explanation questionable. She is yelling “taser, taser, taser” to warn the others. It is also their job to stop her.

They knew in seconds he had a warrant, so they know where he lives, works, who his friends are. They could have shot a tire, could have let him go and found him later. He wasn’t an international criminal on a rampage of destruction.

I am also surprised that an air freshener is cause for a stop - in some states.

Though it is stated more as “anything obstructing the drivers view” - which is the main reason I don’t hang anything.

 

@lausten

Thanks Mriana.

You’re welcome

They knew in seconds he had a warrant, so they know where he lives, works, who his friends are. They could have shot a tire, could have let him go and found him later. He wasn’t an international criminal on a rampage of destruction.

I agree, there was no reason for what she did.

@mrmhead

I am also surprised that an air freshener is cause for a stop – in some states.

Though it is stated more as “anything obstructing the drivers view” – which is the main reason I don’t hang anything.

In some state is it and my mother taught me to never hang anything from the mirror due to obstructing one’s view (to be exact, “You’ll look at that instead of what you’re suppose to be looking at.”), but many people in Missouri hang things from their mirrors.

That said, it was the cop who was the idiot because she [allegedly] confused which was her gun and which was the taser. I don’t believe her. How the heck does a cop confused something like that? IMO she was probably afraid of the black man, because he was black and a man. I don’t believe for a minute she was confused about that. If she was, then she needs to go through more training.
It's not as difficult to get confused under stress as you think.
To the incident. Not only is the “confused” explanation questionable. She is yelling “taser, taser, taser” to warn the others. It is also their job to stop her.

They knew in seconds he had a warrant, so they know where he lives, works, who his friends are. They could have shot a tire, could have let him go and found him later. He wasn’t an international criminal on a rampage of destruction.


You forgot about the resisting arrest part. Not to mention the outstanding warrant was supposedly for a gun related offense.

As for letting him go and finding him later — that’s generally not a good move for law enforcement. ?

I am also surprised that an air freshener is cause for a stop – in some states.
Expired registration was the reason he was stopped.
I am also surprised that an air freshener is cause for a stop
I actually got stopped for this. I came across my graduation tassel when I was 41 years old and hung it on my mirror. I was driving down a country road that has almost no traffic, except of course a County Mountie. He whipped around and pulled me over. These were pre-gray hair days, so it wasn't until he walked up to my window that he noticed I was a little old for a guy with a tassel. I could tell he was embarrassed and he switched into apology mode, explaining why he stopped me. I'm sure if I had been 19 he would have stayed in authority mode and tried to intimidate me.

Brooklyn Center may be a suburb if you look on a map, but for whatever historic reason, it’s not a nice neighborhood. Strip malls have boarded up stores, or even the stores that are open are sleazy. Not massage parlor sleazy but cheap stuff could be a front for something sleazy. I’m sure the cops there are always in authority mode, and for black people, I’m sure they regularly treat them like they are drug dealers or potential criminals. It was a misdemeanor warrant. If I had an outstanding warrant and got pulled over, they would tell me to take care of that and have a nice day. The guy is driving around in the town he lives in. They have his address. If they really wanted to bring him in, they could have just driven by and knocked on the door. He obviously had no plans to flee or he would have done it. It wasn’t until he found himself in a situation where people like him had been killed that he started thinking he wanted to get away.

As for letting him go and finding him later — that’s generally not a good move for law enforcement. -- oneguy
That's the perception problem. First, you're advocating for shooting someone as a "good move". Even tasering him is not necessary. Second, you're seeing every minor offense as an opportunity to cuff someone, haul them in, add to their record, frighten them, fine them, make them late for work, intimidate anyone who looks like him including their children. It should be that encounters with the police are opportunities to increase community support, not make it worse. This is the principle behind "community policing" that is being done around the world, so don't laugh this off.

He has this warrant. He might not have even been aware of it. He’s driving around in his car, using his ID, living where the police know he lives, but suddenly, because of a random stop, the police think they just found Al Capone are going to be heroes. He goes from regular guy to America’s Most Wanted in an instant.

You should consult with police departments to present your theories: The passive non-entity as law enforcement. Citizens cannot rely on you when something goes wrong, but at least you are nice.

Well, it might not be much of a debate given she resign. I’m sure it’s not over yet, but obviously she knows she screwed up or she wouldn’t have resigned.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2021/04/13/kim-potter-daunte-wright-shooting/

You should consult with police departments to present your theories: The passive non-entity as law enforcement. Citizens cannot rely on you when something goes wrong, but at least you are nice. -- one
As always, about two interactions with you is the max. After that you say something nonsensical. I didn't say anything about passive or even nice.

How do you square these two things; guy has a warrant for a 1st degree robbery but the police do nothing, make no effort to contact him. They know what type of car he drives and where he lives but they aren’t looking for him in any active sense 2 months. Guy gets pulled over for a minor reason, and has a warrant, suddenly he is a dangerous potential felon who must be cuffed and threatened with guns drawn. ??

I’ve had one actual attempt at answering the above. I’m putting it out there on various threads. The response was that there are too many warrants and they can’t go looking for everyone. Sounds like a classic “we can’t be proactive” response. So, check with google. There are 19502 incorporated cities and towns, so I’ll use that as a rough definition of areas with police in them. A few articles agree that there are a million or more felony warrants outstanding in the US. That sounds like a lot, until you divide by 19,502. Then it’s 51. They have phones, they have these people’s addresses, call their mothers. If you have time to stop people for a thing hanging from their mirror, you have time to do that.

How do you square these two things; guy has a warrant for a 1st degree robbery but the police do nothing, make no effort to contact him. They know what type of car he drives and where he lives but they aren’t looking for him in any active sense 2 months.
This is speculation.
Guy gets pulled over for a minor reason, and has a warrant, suddenly he is a dangerous potential felon who must be cuffed and threatened with guns drawn. ??
100% YES.

Potter is charged with 2nd degree manslaughter.

I agree with that.