Important Insights Along the Way

I collected some, to me, fundamental concepts today, oh boy

  • Appreciating the Human Mindscape ~ Physical Reality divide

  • I am a self-aware introspective element in the Pageant of Evolution

  • We create our Gods from within ourselves

  • We can not understand an organism, or system for that matter, without understanding its environment

  • Consciousness is the inside reflection of our body, interacting with itself, along with the environment and circumstance, it is embedded within

  • An appreciation for the Deep Time, billions of years worth, and the dance of geology and biology, unfolding one day at a time, that produced me, along with many other wonders

  • There’s no Body-Mind Problem, it is in actuality an Ego-God Problem

  • My body has taken better care of me, than I have of it

  • Consciousness is the product of biology, of interacting, of living, when we die, all that awaits us is the deep dark eternal sleep from which none awake

  • and it is good, live your blessed moment while you have it to live

  • our after-lives unfolds within the hearts of others, and it is good

What am I missing?

I can’t see anything you’ve missed, at least not off hand.

The people who want to take that from you!

Right now, I don’t know what is missing. You have created an intense list. I am going to bed, I’ll read it again tomorrow.

Thanks, and remember, rewrite and reread and rewrite and reread until it nearly drives you crazy, then if you’re lucky you can finally read through something you wrote, without being hung up with yet another thing you overlooked, that you thought you covered.

Okay, I think I’m done with it. Tomorrow will tell. :+1:t4:

  • Appreciating the Human Mindscape ~ Physical Reality divide
  • I am a self-aware introspective element in the Pageant of Evolution
  • We create our Gods from within ourselves
  • We cannot understand an organism, or system for that matter, without understanding its environment
  • Consciousness is the inside reflection of our body, interacting with itself, along with the environment and circumstance it’s embedded within
  • An appreciation for Earth and Deep Time, billions of years worth, and the dance of geology & biology, unfolding one day at a time, and that it produced me, along with many other wonders
  • There is no Body-Mind Problem, it is in actuality an Ego-God Problem
  • My body has taken better care of me, than I have of it
  • Consciousness is the product of Earth’s biology, of interacting, of living, when we die, consciousness ceases, all that awaits us is the deep dark eternal sleep from which none awake, and it is good
  • yes, it is good, live your blessed moment while you have it to live
  • our after-life unfolds within the hearts of others, and it is good.

:scream:
Nope!!! :face_with_symbols_over_mouth:

  • Yes
  • Our
    ===============
    :face_with_symbols_over_mouth: :angry: :crazy_face:

Very good points and each worthy of a topic discussing in detail.
I got another one: Do we live up to our ideals or do we lie to ourselves?

Isn’t that life’s challenge?
That’s the point of a considered life, introspection and self-skepticism.

I spent much of my life in doubt, some of it mighty miserable, though most of it pretty good, to awesome. Now, nearing 67 I have the pleasure of feeling secure in my choices and having chased down those fundamental questions all thinking humans wrestle with.

I don’t live up to all my ideals, but I still strive for them.
(although another good question might me, how well have your ideals managed to live up to your life.)
I’m aware I can kid myself, so try not to take myself tooo seriously.
(Though some of the ideas I’ve formulated I take way seriously ‘mindscape~reality’ and such)
In the end, it’s like the wink of an eye, they say, and I’ve noticed it’s so true, that’s why I really spend most my energy on today and trying to leave tomorrow for tomorrow.

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Of course we lie to ourselves and anyone else who will listen. Since the advent of DNA there is virtually nothing in written form that is based on truth.

If you say so.

But since asked :sunglasses:

Appreciating Evolution

Who Says Understanding Earth’s Evolution is Irrelevant?

Sadly all too many.

I often hear people, not just the religious with their thoughtless rejection and outright contempt for our Earth and her story, but also rational educated people who superficially accept the notion of evolution, yet who seem to have little curiosity about Earth’s Pageant of Evolution, voice complete disinterest.

Too many dismiss the need to learn anything about it as though Evolution were pointless. All the while I’m thinking, but evolution created this world we depend on, why isn’t that worth embracing?

The general apathy doesn’t seem right. Especially considering what an amazingly beautiful, action packed, complex, mysterious and absolutely relevant story Earth’s deep history has to offer us. …

I think we are trying. Totally agree with our evolutionary truths. I think if I explain the human genome the way I am envisioning it, it would be like looking on the same page.
I believe it is absolutely true that everything from potatoes to puppies is made of DNA.
A genome is just a name for the container of libraries of DNA. This is how I envision the Human Genome. The first library in the Human Genome is yourself. The DNA accumulation of yourself begins somewhere during early brain development and becomes most active the moment you are born. In your human Genome are also copies of your mother’s genome and your father’s, these are the libraries of DNA primarily used to identify your heredity transfer there is a library for everything learned over the lifespan of the species. // I am going to stop there to check on your interest.

I don’t understand what you mean. Like you say in the next sentence, our DNA is bequeathed to us by our parents.

Makes me think of something Daniel Dennett wrote in Darwin’s Dangerous Idea

That sounds like Lamarck? Is that what you mean?

So, is the “nature vs nurture” debate over then? Is it all nature?

We apparently have different definitions of the word “learn”. DNA does not store information in the same way the living brain does.

The genome is the entire set of DNA instructions found in a cell. In humans, the genome consists of 23 pairs of chromosomes located in the cell’s nucleus, as well as a small chromosome in the cell’s mitochondria. A genome contains all the information needed for an individual to develop and function.


What is DNA?

DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, is the hereditary material in humans and almost all other organisms. Nearly every cell in a person’s body has the same DNA. Most DNA is located in the cell nucleus (where it is called nuclear DNA), but a small amount of DNA can also be found in the mitochondria (where it is called mitochondrial DNA or mtDNA). Mitochondria are structures within cells that convert the energy from food into a form that cells can use.

The information in DNA is stored as a code made up of four chemical bases: adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). Human DNA consists of about 3 billion bases, and more than 99 percent of those bases are the same in all people. The order, or sequence, of these bases determines the information available for building and maintaining an organism, similar to the way in which letters of the alphabet appear in a certain order to form words and sentences.

Did someone say nature v nurture? Have I got a book for you.
… tough to think it’s nearly 20 years old.

Nature via Nurture by Matt Ridley ©2003

He’s an excellent writer, fun story, well told.

What may be of interest is that whereas humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes, all our cousin great apes have 24 pairs of chromosomes.

The accidental chromosomes mutation in one of our common ancestors marks the exact time that humans split off and established its own hominid branch on the tree of life.

Human Chromosome 2 is a fusion of two ancestral chromosomes
Alec MacAndrew

Introduction

All great apes apart from man have 24 pairs of chromosomes. There is therefore a hypothesis that the common ancestor of all great apes had 24 pairs of chromosomes and that the fusion of two of the ancestor’s chromosomes created chromosome 2 in humans. The evidence for this hypothesis is very strong.

Human - ape chtromosome 2 banding

Let us re-iterate what we find on human chromosome 2. Its centromere is at the same place as the chimpanzee chromosome 2p as determined by sequence similarity. Even more telling is the fact that on the 2q arm of the human chromosome 2 is the unmistakable remains of the original chromosome centromere of the common ancestor of human and chimp 2q chromosome, at the same position as the chimp 2q centromere (this structure in humans no longer acts as a centromere for chromosome 2.

Conclusion

The evidence that human chromosome 2 is a fusion of two of the common ancestor’s chromosomes is overwhelming.

I truly believe it is both nature and nurture. If you don’t have have a real mother nurturing her offspring you get the rhesus monkeys who were fed by an uncaring wirer mother.

You don’t hear the debate framed like that as much lately. Probably because we know more about genetics now. There are genes that can be part of us, but don’t express themselves unless some triggering event happens. I don’t know how that works, but it kind of shows that we are neither a blank slate waiting to be told how to be nor a completely formed personality that would be about the same in any culture.

But if it’s all nature, then what do we need with mothers? Mothers can just leave their babies and go on with their own life, instead of feeding them, changing them, etc etc. They can be just like Topsy and just grow up. But if it’s just nurture, then genetics mean nothing, thus why I believe it’s both. However, I don’t believe children are born tabula rasa.

Excellent point.
We can begin that giving vaginal birth gives the baby a host of beneficial bacteria that protect it from infections and helps with immunity.
Mother’s milk has essential “human” nutrients that allow for growth and further development.
Anytime that the "natural way " becomes disturbed, it is to the detriment of the living organism but also drives evolutionary processes.
Artificial changes don’t drive evolution. If anything they inhibit natural selection for beneficial traits.

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You’d love this book