When the Fire Comes, Paul Krugman, New York Times

Frightening times, considering the lack of critical thinking among so many. As V. demonstrates so well.

When the Fire Comes Paul Krugman FEB. 10, 2017 https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/10/opinion/when-the-fire-comes.html?smid=tw-share&_r=0 ... Unfortunately, the suspension of critical thinking ended as such suspensions usually do — badly. The Bush administration exploited the post-9/11 rush of patriotism to take America into an unrelated war, then used the initial illusion of success in that war to ram through huge tax cuts for the wealthy. Bad as that was, however, the consequences if Donald Trump finds himself similarly empowered will be incomparably worse. We’re only three weeks into the Trump administration, but it’s already clear that any hopes that Mr. Trump and those around him would be even slightly ennobled by the responsibilities of office were foolish. Every day brings further evidence that this is a man who completely conflates the national interest with his personal self-interest, and who has surrounded himself with people who see it the same way. And each day also brings further evidence of his lack of respect for democratic values. You might be tempted to say that the latest flare-up, over Nordstrom’s decision to drop Ivanka Trump’s clothing line, is trivial. But it isn’t. For one thing, until now it would have been inconceivable that a sitting president would attack a private company for decisions that hurt his family’s business interests. But what’s even worse is the way Sean Spicer, Mr. Trump’s spokesman, framed the issue: Nordstrom’s business decision was a “direct attack" on the president’s policies. L’état, c’est moi. ... ...But that’s very different from attacking the very right of a judge — or, as the man who controls 4,000 nuclear weapons put it, a “so-called judge" — to rule against the president. The really striking thing about Mr. Trump’s Twitter tirade, however, was his palpable eagerness to see an attack on America, which would show everyone the folly of constraining his power: ...

So who’s Paul Krugman? What does he know?

Paul Robin Krugman (pronunciation: /ˈkrʊɡmən/ kruug-mən;[1][2] born February 28, 1953)[3] is an American economist, Distinguished Professor of Economics at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and a columnist for The New York Times.[4] In 2008, Krugman was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his contributions to New Trade Theory and New Economic Geography.[5] The Prize Committee cited Krugman's work explaining the patterns of international trade and the geographic distribution of economic activity, by examining the effects of economies of scale and of consumer preferences for diverse goods and services.[6] Krugman was a professor of economics at MIT and later at Princeton University. He retired from Princeton in June 2015 and holds the title of professor emeritus there. He is also Centenary Professor at the London School of Economics and was President of the Eastern Economic Association in 2010.[7] As of 2016, Research Papers in Economics ranked him as the world's 24th most influential economist based on citations of his work.[8] ...https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Krugman...