The deposition Republicans don't want to talk abput

Trump’s lies.
The lawyer gave Donald Trump a note, written in Trump’s own handwriting. He asked Trump to read it aloud.
Trump may not have realized it yet, but he had walked into a trap.
“Peter, you’re a real loser," Trump began reading.
The mogul had sent the note to a reporter, objecting to a story that said Trump owned a “small minority stake" in a Manhattan real estate project. Trump insisted that the word “small" was incorrect. Trump continued reading: “I wrote, ‘Is 50 percent small?’ "
“This [note] was intended to indicate that you had a 50 percent stake in the project, correct?" said the lawyer.
“That’s correct," Trump said.
For the first of many times that day, Trump was about to be caught saying something that wasn’t true.
.
LAWYER: Mr. Trump, do you own 30 percent or 50 percent of the limited partnership?
TRUMP: I own 30 percent.
It was a mid-December morning in 2007 — the start of an interrogation unlike anything else in the public record of Trump’s life.
Trump had brought it on himself. He had sued a reporter, accusing him of being reckless and dishonest in a book that raised questions about Trump’s net worth. The reporter’s attorneys turned the tables and brought Trump in for a deposition.
For two straight days, they asked Trump question after question that touched on the same theme: Trump’s honesty.
The lawyers confronted the mogul with his past statements — and with his company’s internal documents, which often showed those statements had been incorrect or invented. The lawyers were relentless. Trump, the bigger-than-life mogul, was vulnerable — cornered, out-prepared and under oath.
Thirty times, they caught him.
Trump had misstated sales at his condo buildings. Inflated the price of membership at one of his golf clubs. Overstated the depth of his past debts and the number of his employees.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/politics/2016-election/trump-lies/
This is the tip of the iceberg. It’s why we should all demand to see Trump’s tax returns. He is likely to have been just as dishonest to the IRS as he has been in all of his other dealings–and in his campaign speeches. His lies, manipulations and dishonest dealings should be public knowledge well BEFORE the election. (I was going to say “all” but it will be impossible to find anywhere near all of them, there have been so many.)

Trump's lies. The lawyer gave Donald Trump a note, written in Trump’s own handwriting. He asked Trump to read it aloud. Trump may not have realized it yet, but he had walked into a trap. “Peter, you’re a real loser," Trump began reading. The mogul had sent the note to a reporter, objecting to a story that said Trump owned a “small minority stake" in a Manhattan real estate project. Trump insisted that the word “small" was incorrect. Trump continued reading: “I wrote, ‘Is 50 percent small?’ " “This [note] was intended to indicate that you had a 50 percent stake in the project, correct?" said the lawyer. “That’s correct," Trump said. For the first of many times that day, Trump was about to be caught saying something that wasn’t true. . LAWYER: Mr. Trump, do you own 30 percent or 50 percent of the limited partnership? TRUMP: I own 30 percent. It was a mid-December morning in 2007 — the start of an interrogation unlike anything else in the public record of Trump’s life. Trump had brought it on himself. He had sued a reporter, accusing him of being reckless and dishonest in a book that raised questions about Trump’s net worth. The reporter’s attorneys turned the tables and brought Trump in for a deposition. For two straight days, they asked Trump question after question that touched on the same theme: Trump’s honesty. The lawyers confronted the mogul with his past statements — and with his company’s internal documents, which often showed those statements had been incorrect or invented. The lawyers were relentless. Trump, the bigger-than-life mogul, was vulnerable — cornered, out-prepared and under oath. Thirty times, they caught him. Trump had misstated sales at his condo buildings. Inflated the price of membership at one of his golf clubs. Overstated the depth of his past debts and the number of his employees. https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/politics/2016-election/trump-lies/ This is the tip of the iceberg. It's why we should all demand to see Trump's tax returns. He is likely to have been just as dishonest to the IRS as he has been in all of his other dealings--and in his campaign speeches. His lies, manipulations and dishonest dealings should be public knowledge well BEFORE the election. (I was going to say "all" but it will be impossible to find anywhere near all of them, there have been so many.)
Lois, let’s be fair. Fahrenthold has done nothing but write stories against Trump. O’Harrow Jr. on the other hand seems to be a good reporter. So, what is going on here? It seem to me that Trump pissed O’Harrow Jr. off by suing a Washington Post reporter. O’Harrow Jr. wanted to get at Trump for that, so he let Fahrenthold into the Washington Post by co-authoring a story. It looks like O’Harrow Jr. wanted to label Trump a liar. Fahrenthold was able to dig up some nine year old data that after two straight days of questioning discredited Trump and thus they labeled him a liar. Now the question is. Should one think, “Oh, my god, he lied!" Or should one think that in the world of business that these types of things happen and may even be a daily occurrence? Isn’t business dealing sort of like a big chest game and the part of the game is to make your opponent miss judge your next move. I don’t think that Trump lost any votes over the story. And I don’t think any Republican’s think Trump is always correct either. But I do think that most Republican’s think that Trump is not deceitful like Hillary.
Now the question is. Should one think, “Oh, my god, he lied!" Or should one think that in the world of business that these types of things happen and may even be a daily occurrence? Isn’t business dealing sort of like a big chest game and the part of the game is to make your opponent miss judge your next move. I don’t think that Trump lost any votes over the story. And I don’t think any Republican’s think Trump is always correct either. But I do think that most Republican’s think that Trump is not deceitful like Hillary.
These stories you concoct are amazing. If court documents in a legal suit that used data from accountants are not good enough for you, then I'm sure nothing is. What I get from you is, "People lie, whatever, it's fine, well, if they are business people. But if someone is crooked, well, that's no good, especially politicians."
Trump's lies. The lawyer gave Donald Trump a note, written in Trump’s own handwriting. He asked Trump to read it aloud. Trump may not have realized it yet, but he had walked into a trap. “Peter, you’re a real loser," Trump began reading. The mogul had sent the note to a reporter, objecting to a story that said Trump owned a “small minority stake" in a Manhattan real estate project. Trump insisted that the word “small" was incorrect. Trump continued reading: “I wrote, ‘Is 50 percent small?’ " “This [note] was intended to indicate that you had a 50 percent stake in the project, correct?" said the lawyer. “That’s correct," Trump said. For the first of many times that day, Trump was about to be caught saying something that wasn’t true. . LAWYER: Mr. Trump, do you own 30 percent or 50 percent of the limited partnership? TRUMP: I own 30 percent. It was a mid-December morning in 2007 — the start of an interrogation unlike anything else in the public record of Trump’s life. Trump had brought it on himself. He had sued a reporter, accusing him of being reckless and dishonest in a book that raised questions about Trump’s net worth. The reporter’s attorneys turned the tables and brought Trump in for a deposition. For two straight days, they asked Trump question after question that touched on the same theme: Trump’s honesty. The lawyers confronted the mogul with his past statements — and with his company’s internal documents, which often showed those statements had been incorrect or invented. The lawyers were relentless. Trump, the bigger-than-life mogul, was vulnerable — cornered, out-prepared and under oath. Thirty times, they caught him. Trump had misstated sales at his condo buildings. Inflated the price of membership at one of his golf clubs. Overstated the depth of his past debts and the number of his employees. https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/politics/2016-election/trump-lies/ This is the tip of the iceberg. It's why we should all demand to see Trump's tax returns. He is likely to have been just as dishonest to the IRS as he has been in all of his other dealings--and in his campaign speeches. His lies, manipulations and dishonest dealings should be public knowledge well BEFORE the election. (I was going to say "all" but it will be impossible to find anywhere near all of them, there have been so many.)
Lois, let’s be fair. Fahrenthold has done nothing but write stories against Trump. O’Harrow Jr. on the other hand seems to be a good reporter. So, what is going on here? It seem to me that Trump pissed O’Harrow Jr. off by suing a Washington Post reporter. O’Harrow Jr. wanted to get at Trump for that, so he let Fahrenthold into the Washington Post by co-authoring a story. It looks like O’Harrow Jr. wanted to label Trump a liar. Fahrenthold was able to dig up some nine year old data that after two straight days of questioning discredited Trump and thus they labeled him a liar. Now the question is. Should one think, “Oh, my god, he lied!" Or should one think that in the world of business that these types of things happen and may even be a daily occurrence? Isn’t business dealing sort of like a big chest game and the part of the game is to make your opponent miss judge your next move. I don’t think that Trump lost any votes over the story. And I don’t think any Republican’s think Trump is always correct either. But I do think that most Republican’s think that Trump is not deceitful like Hillary. Of course his backers would not admit that he's deceitful. They are Trump backers after all, and have proven they are easily duped. Trump is the most deceitful person I have ever had the displeasure to know about. He demonizes everyone who opposes him. He has demonized Hillary in every way anyone could imagine. He demonized Obama over his birth records. He is a deceitful scurrilous person who should never have been a presidential nominee or a nominee for any political position. He has made the United States and the Republican party a laughingstock around the world and inside the US among Americans who are rational. Anyone who backs him for president is an ignorant fool. I am glad to see that a few Republicans have some sense and a backbone. Trump has completely ruined the Republican party with his moronic, deceitful antics. Any Republican who has not distanced himself from Trump and his antics in this fiasco deserves to have his or her reputation go down in flames.

Blame the messenger - Do a google search, you’ll find the basic story reported from a number of directions.
Hell here’s one from 2009, in the Wall Street Journal even.
Regarding the deposition in the Mr. O’Brien lawsuit, author of “TrumpNation: The Art of Being the Donald,”

Trump on Trump: Testimony Offers Glimpse of How He Values His Empire Worth Rises, Falls 'With Markets and Attitudes And With Feelings, Even My Own Feeling' By ALEX FRANGOS Updated May 18, 2009 http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB124261067783429043 It's one of the great mysteries of the business world: How much is Donald Trump really worth? The world famous real-estate developer and television personality has consistently said it's in the billions. A 2005 book citing anonymous sources said it was between $150 million and $250 million. Mr. Trump sued the writer for defamation. He alleged damage to his reputation that caused him to lose out on future deals in locales from Philadelphia to Kiev. "My net worth fluctuates, and it goes up and down with markets and with attitudes and with feelings, even my own feeling," he told lawyers in the December 2007 deposition. ... The deposition, marked "Confidential," comes to light at a time when some of Mr. Trump's projects, including several condominium developments that bear his name, are struggling. Among the problems are anemic sales, lawsuits, sharp declines in value and troubles with creditors. The deposition reveals he told his bankers and New Jersey casino authorities in 2004 and 2005 that he was worth approximately $3.6 billion. In 2005, Deutsche Bank evaluated his net worth as part of underwriting a $640 million construction loan it made to Mr. Trump's Chicago condo and hotel project. The bank said his worth was $788 million, according to information presented by the author's lawyers present during Mr. Trump's deposition.... also see http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB124261160266029087
http://law.justia.com/cases/new-jersey/appellate-division-published/2011/a6141-08-opn.html DONALD TRUMP v. TIMOTHY L. O'BRIEN
What I get from you is, "People lie, whatever, it's fine, well, if they are business people. But if someone is crooked, well, that's no good, especially politicians."
Ever go to a auto dealership? Would it surprise you that you may have been lied to?

I’ve taken many depositions. It’s useful for a witness to prepare for them. You don’t want to have your deposition taken if you know that your testimony will likely demonstrate that an action you commenced has no basis. Unless, that is, you’re a fool or your purpose is not the honorable one of establishing your veracity in a case of this kind, and your motivation is rather to harass and punish.

What I get from you is, "People lie, whatever, it's fine, well, if they are business people. But if someone is crooked, well, that's no good, especially politicians."
Ever go to a auto dealership? Would it surprise you that you may have been lied to? Yes, and I wouldn't buy a used car from Donald Trump. Get it?
What I get from you is, "People lie, whatever, it's fine, well, if they are business people. But if someone is crooked, well, that's no good, especially politicians."
Ever go to a auto dealership? Would it surprise you that you may have been lied to? Yes, and I wouldn't buy a used car from Donald Trump. Get it? Ok, say the world is the car. Trump brings up the fact that there is an immigration problem. Trump brings up the fact that the American deals with other countries are lop sided and are hurting our country. Trump brings up problem after problem with the car. Hillary on the other hand say the car is fine and we just need to make bigger monthly payments for the car. The problem is you need a car. Now you are going to have to deal with one of the salespersons. Are you buying your car on your take of the personality of the salesperson or how much the dealership will fix up the car for you? There is where the next problem lays in having to trust that the dealership will fix the car as promised. Right now, I would buy my used car from Trump.
Right now, I would buy my used car from Trump.
Trump is selling you a 1972 Pinto.
Right now, I would buy my used car from Trump.
Trump is selling you a 1972 Pinto. Could be right. But the Pinto might be the logical choice. Make the wrong choice and may end up with a Schwinn. :-)
Right now, I would buy my used car from Trump.
Trump is selling you a 1972 Pinto. Could be right. But the Pinto might be the logical choice. Make the wrong choice and may end up with a Schwinn. :-) Then again you might wind up with that Pinto, . . . when you'd have been much better off with the Schwinn.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAI5T8UecEY
(Mike, jump to 1:15 if all that talk is too boring.) Though I'll give it to you Mike perfect analogy - Trump is trying to sell America a Pinto sure to blow up on impact.
Right now, I would buy my used car from Trump.
Trump is selling you a 1972 Pinto. Could be right. But the Pinto might be the logical choice. Make the wrong choice and may end up with a Schwinn. :-) Then again you might wind up with that Pinto, . . . when you'd have been much better off with the Schwinn.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAI5T8UecEY
(Mike, jump to 1:15 if all that talk is too boring.) Though I'll give it to you Mike perfect analogy - Trump is trying to sell America a Pinto sure to blow up on impact. Got to say there is a lot of humor in your postings. Good job.
Trump's lies. The lawyer gave Donald Trump a note, written in Trump’s own handwriting. He asked Trump to read it aloud. Trump may not have realized it yet, but he had walked into a trap. “Peter, you’re a real loser," Trump began reading. The mogul had sent the note to a reporter, objecting to a story that said Trump owned a “small minority stake" in a Manhattan real estate project. Trump insisted that the word “small" was incorrect. Trump continued reading: “I wrote, ‘Is 50 percent small?’ " “This [note] was intended to indicate that you had a 50 percent stake in the project, correct?" said the lawyer. “That’s correct," Trump said. For the first of many times that day, Trump was about to be caught saying something that wasn’t true. . LAWYER: Mr. Trump, do you own 30 percent or 50 percent of the limited partnership? TRUMP: I own 30 percent. It was a mid-December morning in 2007 — the start of an interrogation unlike anything else in the public record of Trump’s life. Trump had brought it on himself. He had sued a reporter, accusing him of being reckless and dishonest in a book that raised questions about Trump’s net worth. The reporter’s attorneys turned the tables and brought Trump in for a deposition. For two straight days, they asked Trump question after question that touched on the same theme: Trump’s honesty. The lawyers confronted the mogul with his past statements — and with his company’s internal documents, which often showed those statements had been incorrect or invented. The lawyers were relentless. Trump, the bigger-than-life mogul, was vulnerable — cornered, out-prepared and under oath. Thirty times, they caught him. Trump had misstated sales at his condo buildings. Inflated the price of membership at one of his golf clubs. Overstated the depth of his past debts and the number of his employees. https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/politics/2016-election/trump-lies/ This is the tip of the iceberg. It's why we should all demand to see Trump's tax returns. He is likely to have been just as dishonest to the IRS as he has been in all of his other dealings--and in his campaign speeches. His lies, manipulations and dishonest dealings should be public knowledge well BEFORE the election. (I was going to say "all" but it will be impossible to find anywhere near all of them, there have been so many.)
Lois, let’s be fair. Fahrenthold has done nothing but write stories against Trump. O’Harrow Jr. on the other hand seems to be a good reporter. So, what is going on here? It seem to me that Trump pissed O’Harrow Jr. off by suing a Washington Post reporter. O’Harrow Jr. wanted to get at Trump for that, so he let Fahrenthold into the Washington Post by co-authoring a story. It looks like O’Harrow Jr. wanted to label Trump a liar. Fahrenthold was able to dig up some nine year old data that after two straight days of questioning discredited Trump and thus they labeled him a liar. Now the question is. Should one think, “Oh, my god, he lied!" Or should one think that in the world of business that these types of things happen and may even be a daily occurrence? Isn’t business dealing sort of like a big chest game and the part of the game is to make your opponent miss judge your next move. I don’t think that Trump lost any votes over the story. And I don’t think any Republican’s think Trump is always correct either. But I do think that most Republican’s think that Trump is not deceitful like Hillary. That might be decent reasoning if it were anyone but Trump. Trump is a different case altogether. We can't treat him like a normal candidate or even a normal human being. LL
What I get from you is, "People lie, whatever, it's fine, well, if they are business people. But if someone is crooked, well, that's no good, especially politicians."
Ever go to a auto dealership? Would it surprise you that you may have been lied to? Yes, and I wouldn't buy a used car from Donald Trump. Get it? Ok, say the world is the car. Trump brings up the fact that there is an immigration problem. Trump brings up the fact that the American deals with other countries are lop sided and are hurting our country. Trump brings up problem after problem with the car. Hillary on the other hand say the car is fine and we just need to make bigger monthly payments for the car. The problem is you need a car. Now you are going to have to deal with one of the salespersons. Are you buying your car on your take of the personality of the salesperson or how much the dealership will fix up the car for you? There is where the next problem lays in having to trust that the dealership will fix the car as promised. Right now, I would buy my used car from Trump. I hope you have good towing insurance.