Christmas ad

Touching, but only possible with “Christians” fighting “Christians”. It wouldn’t happen with Christians fighting Muslims.
A moving new commercial by Sainsbury’s, a large supermarket chain in the United Kingdom, has gone viral worldwide over the past several days. The ad is set on Christmas Eve of 1914, when troops fighting in the trenches of World War I agreed on a series of unofficial truces.
In the commercial, the fighting soldiers can be seen greeting each other, then playing a game of soccer and ultimately returning to their posts after exchanging gifts.
Viewers unanimously agreed that the ad is among the best they have ever seen.
“This advert is wonderful. The best by far this year,” one wrote. “It’s a marvel, it really is. Such a thoughtful and poignant message that everyone can get along and be nice to each other despite wars going on.”
“The best part about this is that it really happened,” wrote another person.
According to The Blaze, the proceeds from the items featured in the commercial will go to benefit organizations that help the armed forces.
Sainsbury’s OFFICIAL Christmas 2014 Ad
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=NWF2JBb1bvM

It did indeed happen. What also happened was that those in command of the armies promptly prohibited any friendly communication or fraternization with the enemy when they learned the Christmas Truce had taken place.

And it only happened once, in the British-Belgian sector. They self declared a truce, buried their dead, sang Xmas carols and played soccer together. Most wanted to do just that rather than shoot at each other. Then they got a butt chewing from high command. BTW Ciceronius, didn’t know you were a Patrick O’Brian fan. He’s my favorite nautical fiction writer. Maturin is my favorite character, he and Padeen.
Cap’t Jack

And it only happened once, in the British-Belgian sector. They self declared a truce, buried their dead, sang Xmas carols and played soccer together. Most wanted to do just that rather than shoot at each other. Then they got a butt chewing from high command. BTW Ciceronius, didn't know you were a Patrick O'Brian fan. He's my favorite nautical fiction writer. Maturin is my favorite character, he and Padeen. Cap't Jack
He wrote wonderful books, probably the best historical novels I've ever read. I was looking forward to the adventures of Admiral Aubry and Maturin.

Did you have the opportunity to read 21? I only wish that someone competent could at least finish it. I hate to be left hanging! I’ve read several nautical series stories since then but none of them measure up to O’Brian although Dewey Lambden comes close.
Cap’t Jack

From various first hand accounts I’ve read I think the dirty little secret of war is that once into it, most soldiers quickly realize the enemy isn’t the guy they’re shooting at. It’s the politician who sent them there in the first place, regardless of which side you’re on.

Did you have the opportunity to read 21? I only wish that someone competent could at least finish it. I hate to be left hanging! I've read several nautical series stories since then but none of them measure up to O'Brian although Dewey Lambden comes close. Cap't Jack
I did read it, and was sad to do so. I'll have to read Lamben. Bernard Cornwell has written some good historical novels about the same period from the perspective of the army in his Sharpe series, but though enjoyable they aren't of the same quality. Gore Vidal wrote good historical novels as did Mary Renault. But O'Brian was very special.

I followed the Sharpe series on the BBC but never read the books. You might also try Julian Stockwin’s excellent series. His character is a Jack Aubrey-type figure although a “tarpaulin” sailor up from the ranks. I’m familiar with Vidal’s fiction as well. I read his book on Lincoln a while back.
Cap’t Jack