Any one here familiar with 'deep time'

This is weird…since I have a healthy sense of self-skepticism and like second opinions, let me ask…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Lapworth
Charles Lapworth, FRS, FGS (20 September 1842 – 13 March 1920) was an English geologist[1] who pioneered faunal analysis using index fossils and identified the Ordovician period….
Following his researches in the Southern Uplands Charles Lapworth also devoted time to mapping near Durness in Scotland’s northwest highlands and was first to propose the controversial theory that here older rocks were found lying above younger, suggesting complex folding or faulting as a cause. Later Peach and Horne were dispatched to the area and their monumental memoir proved Lapworth correct. In the English Midlands his research involved important work in Shropshire and the demonstration that Cambrian rocks underlay the Carboniferous rocks between Nuneaton and Atherstone.

Carboniferous (359.2 to 299.0 may)
Cambrian (542.0 to 488.3 may)

Does Wiki have that backwards or am I misreading something?

You familiar with Iain Stewart the geologist? "BBC Men of Rock 2 of 3 Moving Mountains"
Anyone here into geology? I'm thinking about it because this evening I don't want to deal with VWC or AGW and have been re-watching a three part series, that's really impressed me. It's been around a few year ©2012 I think. I really like it because Iain brings up people and facts that "science popularizers" haven't gotten to yet. I like it, I think it's going to give me something fun to write about for a change. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWwoNdvDTAw ======================================================= Okay back to my real question, anyone around here fascinated by geology and understanding Earth's grand story?

Looks like a sloppy WIKI entry.

Charles Lapworth (1842–1920) Authority on Graptolites and the Lower Palaeozoic Oxford Geology Group http://www.ogg.uk.com/#!charles-lapworth/c22te Lapworth is best known for pioneering faunal analysis of Silurian beds in Southern Scotland by means of index fossils, especially graptolites, and also for his proposal that the strata between the Cambrian beds of north Wales and the Silurian beds of South Wales should be assigned to a new geological period: the Ordovician. He is also famous for his fieldwork and interpretation of the geology of the Northwest Highlands, in particular the Moine Thrust. …. He was able to show that what was thought to be a thick sequence of Silurian rocks was in fact a much thinner series of strata repeated as a result of faulting and folding. His work resulted in the Geological Survey having to re-map and re-interpret the entire area. His researches were published in 1899, in the ‘Memoir on the Geology of the Southern Uplands of Scotland’. ... His understanding of the fossil fauna of the Lower Palaeozoic led to his resolving the great Cambrian – Silurian controversy. The boundary between Adam Sedgwick's Cambrian System and Roderick Murchison's Silurian System had been in dispute for many years. Lapworth resolved the issue by demonstrating three distinct fauna. He used these to divide the Lower Palaeozoic into three rather than two stratigraphic units – the Cambrian System (oldest), a new system that he named the Ordovician, and the Silurian System (youngest). The Ordovician, named after a Roman-British tribe that inhabited northwest Wales, incorporated Sedgwick’s Upper Cambrian and Murchison’s Lower Silurian. His work was published in 1879 as ‘On the tripartite classification of the Lower Palaeozoic rocks’. ... Murchison had believed that the Moine schists, previously supposed to be ‘Primitive’, were no older than his recently created Silurian period, because limestone and quartzite containing ‘Lower Silurian’ (Cambrian) fossils lay beneath them. From 1858 Archibald Geikie aided Murchison in his mapping of Scotland. They traced out the contact between the Cambrian strata and the Moine Supergroup, believing it to be stratigraphic despite having recognised that the Moine was metamorphosed but the underlying strata were not. James Nicol, Professor of Geology at Aberdeen University, was amongst the first to dispute this interpretation. He believed that the Moine was faulted against the Cambrian and ’forced over the quartzites’, even suggesting that the Moine might represent rocks that underlay the Cambrian. He said the fault was an important structural feature which could be traced from Durness to Skye and showed this on his 1858 Geological Map of Scotland.
Carboniferous (359.2 to 299.0 mya) Devonian (416.0 to 359.2 mya) Silurian (443.7 to 416.0 mya) Ordovician (488.3 to 443.7 mya) Cambrian (542.0 to 488.3 mya) beginnings of complex life Precambrian (before complex life) (542.0 mya - 4600 mya to) OK, back to Iain.

I’ve studied a little bit of geology and given the length of time involved, I wouldn’t be surprised at how the Earth can fold and mix up the time periods in question. I grew up in the Appalachian mountains and still live on the fringes of them, and they are supposed to be the oldest mountain range in the world. Seeing what they are now, and knowing what geology teaches that they once were, and the stages they went through, I wouldn’t be very much surprised at anything. I would have to look at one of the folios again, but I believe that all those periods are represented in the rocks here.

You familiar with Iain Stewart the geologist? "BBC Men of Rock 2 of 3 Moving Mountains"
Anyone here into geology? I'm thinking about it because this evening I don't want to deal with VWC or AGW and have been re-watching a three part series, that's really impressed me. It's been around a few year ©2012 I think. I really like it because Iain brings up people and facts that "science popularizers" haven't gotten to yet. I like it, I think it's going to give me something fun to write about for a change. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWwoNdvDTAw ======================================================= Okay back to my real question, anyone around here fascinated by geology and understanding Earth's grand story?
I'll have to watch the series later, right now it's midnight local time and I need to get to bed. Thanks for the link.
I've studied a little bit of geology and given the length of time involved, I wouldn't be surprised at how the Earth can fold and mix up the time periods in question. I grew up in the Appalachian mountains and still live on the fringes of them, and they are supposed to be the oldest mountain range in the world. Seeing what they are now, and knowing what geology teaches that they once were, and the stages they went through, I wouldn't be very much surprised at anything. I would have to look at one of the folios again, but I believe that all those periods are represented in the rocks here.
Are you familiar with WildwoodClaire1 on You Tube? She's a geologist, she's folky and puts out some interesting geology videos and I know from double checking a few things she's said - that what she says stands up pretty good to independent sources. She's put together a pretty interesting 5 part YouTube series on the formation of the Appalachian mountains.
Appalachian Geology, Pt 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EpC31JbMY-A
She's put together a pretty interesting 5 part YouTube series on the formation of the Appalachian mountains.
Appalachian Geology, Pt 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EpC31JbMY-A
Thankyou again for the link, I watched the 1st episode and will watch the rest later.

I watched BBC Men of Rock 1, and was part way through when I realized that it was more about the geologists than the geology. Certainly the geology was presented to illustrate the discoveries, and once this detail was understood it was quite informative. I will watch the other programs, but right now building a deck is a priority for me.

I really need to be careful what I watch on youtube, every time I watch a program, youtube provides many examples of others like it the next time I open the page. It’s really not so bad except when my grandson watches Lego’s or Minecraft, then my page is loaded with that kind of program, pushing out the ones I would watch.

I really need to be careful what I watch on youtube, every time I watch a program, youtube provides many examples of others like it the next time I open the page. It's really not so bad except when my grandson watches Lego's or Minecraft, then my page is loaded with that kind of program, pushing out the ones I would watch.
Have you tried DAP (Download Accelerator Plus)? It will down load directly from YouTube in seconds and stored in the DAP downloads file for later viewing on a versatile player such as VLC media player. These excellent programs are both free of charge. http://www.speedbit.com/DAP/ http://www.videolan.org/vlc/ As to Plate tectonics, from Wiki,
Main article: Plate tectonics In plate tectonics the outermost part of the earth, the crust and uppermost mantle, act as a single mechanical layer, the lithosphere. The lithosphere is divided into separate 'plates' that move relative to each other on the underlying, relatively weak asthenosphere in a process ultimately driven by the continuous loss of heat from the earth's interior. There are three main types of plate boundary: divergent where plates move apart from each other and new lithosphere is formed in the process of sea-floor spreading; transform where plates slide past each other and convergent where plates converge and the lithosphere is 'consumed' by the process of subduction. Convergent and transform boundaries form the largest structural discontinuities in the lithosphere and are responsible for most of the world's major (Mw > 7) earthquakes. Convergent and divergent boundaries are also the site of most of the world's volcanoes, such as around the Pacific Ring of Fire. Most of the deformation in the lithosphere is related to the interaction between plates, either directly or indirectly.
Seems to me that explains the possibility of older layers being forced over later layers. The fact that this is not a global but a local phenomenon also speaks of local tectonic activity, resulting in the subduction of later layers and pushing up of earlier layers in specific areas.
Are you familiar with WildwoodClaire1 on You Tube? She’s a geologist, she’s folky and puts out some interesting geology videos and I know from double checking a few things she’s said - that what she says stands up pretty good to independent sources. She’s put together a pretty interesting 5 part YouTube series on the formation of the Appalachian mountains. Appalachian Geology, Pt 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EpC31JbMY-A
Thanks for the link CC, I Hadn't seen her video or even heard of her for that matter. But damn, what an interesting and enlightening video on the Appalachian Mountain chain. You can see this for yourself when traveling from our area through Va. Where the layered, exposed rock is hooved up almost vertically in some places. It's also wonderful to hear that Appalachian accent even if it's a bit slight. Our area, the TransAppalachian highlands is mainly sandstone with coal seams running through it so you don't see any cranberry gneiss except in pebble form. I plan to watch the whole series and recommend it to my students. Cap't Jack
Are you familiar with WildwoodClaire1 on You Tube? She’s a geologist, she’s folky and puts out some interesting geology videos and I know from double checking a few things she’s said - that what she says stands up pretty good to independent sources. She’s put together a pretty interesting 5 part YouTube series on the formation of the Appalachian mountains. Appalachian Geology, Pt 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EpC31JbMY-A
Thanks for the link CC, I Hadn't seen her video or even heard of her for that matter. But damn, what an interesting and enlightening video on the Appalachian Mountain chain. You can see this for yourself when traveling from our area through Va. Where the layered, exposed rock is hooved up almost vertically in some places. It's also wonderful to hear that Appalachian accent even if it's a bit slight. Our area, the TransAppalachian highlands is mainly sandstone with coal seams running through it so you don't see any cranberry gneiss except in pebble form. I plan to watch the whole series and recommend it to my students. Cap't Jack
It's interesting to drive north through Pa. where the highway has gone through deep cuts in the mountains, In one cut the layers of rock will be angled in one direction, and in the next the layers will be in the opposite direction, and the layers will alternate as you travel. Many years ago I discovered that the rock layers pointed to the tops and the bottoms of the original mountains, and that the whole area was eroded to a flat plane, and then the bottom of a shallow sea. Uplift and erosion has given us the current skeleton of the original mountain range. In my area you can see that the whole area was once a flat plane because most of the mountain tops are the same height and straight, and some mountains are still flat on top.

:coolsmile:

http://www.geog.nau.edu/courses/alew/ggr346/ft/e-highlands/index-ap.html

You can see this drawing in 3D when you fly over the area. The Shenandoah valley is dotted with limestone outcroppings throughout from Lexington to Winchester. Cool drawing BTW.
Cap’t Jack