Not So Great Pacific Garbage Patch

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Is 16 Times Bigger Than We Thought
https://www.fastcompany.com/40548220/the-great-pacific-garbage-patch-is-16-times-bigger-than-we-thought
This is what I really needed to know to make my day.

Amazing how much plastic ends up in the ocean.

Plumbers have a saying, “shit runs downhill”, guess plastic fits the pattern.

I’m trying to buy only aluminum cans when I get single serve drinks, and I just bought a reusable straw.

Plumbers have a saying, "shit runs downhill", guess plastic fits the pattern.
A lot of shit does not reach the oceans because it is biodegradable.

LOL
Spoken just like Drax The Destroyer. :slight_smile:

Plumbers have a saying, "shit runs downhill", guess plastic fits the pattern.
A lot of shit does not reach the oceans because it is biodegradable. There's another saying: 'The devil is in the details' :cheese:
Plumbers have a saying, "shit runs downhill", guess plastic fits the pattern.
A lot of shit does not reach the oceans because it is biodegradable. Lets hope no one drinks it before it biodegrades...... :-/

This stuff is just too complicated and weird.
Sunscreen Chemicals Are Destroying Coral Reefs And Now Hawaii Is Banning Them
https://www.buzzfeed.com/mbvd/toxic-ingredients-in-sunscreen-are-killing-coral-reefs-and?utm_term=.uwD18qPd5#.jqGbd5rnG

Oxybenzone and octinoxate are destroying the oceans around the world, according to scientists whose research has shown that the chemicals break down coral by leaching it of nutrients and disrupt the development of fish and marine life, like sea urchins and algae. About 14,000 tons of sunscreen lotion ends up in coral reefs around the world each year, according to a study published in 2015 in the Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. The highest concentrations of sunscreen were found in tourist-filled beaches, like many in Hawaii and the US Virgin Islands.
Who knew? What is happening that we haven't figured out yet? Maybe we should wrap the planet up in plastic and not touch it. Stick it in the freezer? psik
This stuff is just too complicated and weird. Sunscreen Chemicals Are Destroying Coral Reefs And Now Hawaii Is Banning Them https://www.buzzfeed.com/mbvd/toxic-ingredients-in-sunscreen-are-killing-coral-reefs-and?utm_term=.uwD18qPd5#.jqGbd5rnG
Oxybenzone and octinoxate are destroying the oceans around the world, according to scientists whose research has shown that the chemicals break down coral by leaching it of nutrients and disrupt the development of fish and marine life, like sea urchins and algae. About 14,000 tons of sunscreen lotion ends up in coral reefs around the world each year, according to a study published in 2015 in the Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. The highest concentrations of sunscreen were found in tourist-filled beaches, like many in Hawaii and the US Virgin Islands.
Who knew? What is happening that we haven't figured out yet?
IMO, a lot. And as "having it figured out yet", it seems we are unable to think past "not getting a sun-burn". Maybe we should wrap the planet up in plastic and not touch it. Stick it in the freezer? psik That's the problem, as Carlin said "plastic" is the one thing the earth couldn't make. Needed humans and we have made it so now we can be phased out. And as the earth cannot reabsorb plastic, it has adopted a new paradigm "the earth plus plastic".
Who knew?
A few have been warning about these sorts of things. The real question, mystery, why do so few care to learn about it, or worry about it? Who wants to know? Our society is built upon us ignoring the consequences, and externalities, of our actions. We hate bugs so kill them en mass, without ever appreciating, hell ever giving a flying fuk, about all the ecological functions they serve. Functions our varied environments depend on for their survival. With us being dependent on these environments remaining healthy and viable for our own health. Rachel Carson warned us way back in 1962 when I was a kid. Now I'm witnessing the very unraveling she warn use against, but too few actually learn about it. And ever fewer actually cared.

… or care today.


Here we go,
more of the same,
but different:

Microplastics found in Great Lakes water, beer KARE 11 Published on May 7, 2018 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tvvgqgk9Agg U of M researchers have found microplastic contamination in tap water taken from the Great Lakes, and beer brewed with water from the Great Lakes, in a big study recently published in a scientific journal.
PLOS Open Source Anthropogenic contamination of tap water, beer, and sea salt Mary Kosuth , Sherri A. Mason , Elizabeth V. Wattenberg Published: April 11, 2018 //doi org/10.1371/journal.pone.0194970
Abstract Plastic pollution has been well documented in natural environments, including the open waters and sediments within lakes and rivers, the open ocean and even the air, but less attention has been paid to synthetic polymers in human consumables. Since multiple toxicity studies indicate risks to human health when plastic particles are ingested, more needs to be known about the presence and abundance of anthropogenic particles in human foods and beverages. This study investigates the presence of anthropogenic particles in 159 samples of globally sourced tap water, 12 brands of Laurentian Great Lakes beer, and 12 brands of commercial sea salt. Of the tap water samples analyzed, 81% were found to contain anthropogenic particles. The majority of these particles were fibers (98.3%) between 0.1–5 mm in length. The range was 0 to 61 particles/L, with an overall mean of 5.45 particles/L. Anthropogenic debris was found in each brand of beer and salt. Of the extracted particles, over 99% were fibers. After adjusting for particles found in lab blanks for both salt and beer, the average number of particles found in beer was 4.05 particles/L with a range of 0 to 14.3 particles/L and the average number of particles found in each brand of salt was 212 particles/kg with a range of 46.7 to 806 particles/kg. Based on consumer guidelines, our results indicate the average person ingests over 5,800 particles of synthetic debris from these three sources annually, with the largest contribution coming from tap water (88%).
Editorial Microplastics and human health—an urgent problem https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanplh/article/PIIS2542-5196(17)30121-3/fulltext Volume 1, No. 7, e254, October 2017