Michael Wolff's 'Fire and Fury': trump didn't want to be president

Kind of explains why he treats the position as a total joke, he never wanted to hold it.
http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2018/01/michael-wolff-fire-and-fury-book-donald-trump.html

On the afternoon of November 8, 2016, Kellyanne Conway settled into her glass office at Trump Tower. Right up until the last weeks of the race, the campaign headquarters had remained a listless place. All that seemed to distinguish it from a corporate back office were a few posters with right-wing slogans. Conway, the campaign’s manager, was in a remarkably buoyant mood, considering she was about to experience a resounding, if not cataclysmic, defeat. Donald Trump would lose the election — of this she was sure — but he would quite possibly hold the defeat to under six points. That was a substantial victory. As for the looming defeat itself, she shrugged it off: It was Reince Priebus’s fault, not hers. She had spent a good part of the day calling friends and allies in the political world and blaming Priebus, the chairman of the Republican National Committee. Now she briefed some of the television producers and anchors whom she had been carefully courting since joining the Trump campaign — and with whom she had been actively interviewing in the last few weeks, hoping to land a permanent on-air job after the election. Even though the numbers in a few key states had appeared to be changing to Trump’s advantage, neither Conway nor Trump himself nor his son-in-law, Jared Kushner — the effective head of the campaign — ­wavered in their certainty: Their unexpected adventure would soon be over. Not only would Trump not be president, almost everyone in the campaign agreed, he should probably not be. Conveniently, the former conviction meant nobody had to deal with the latter issue. As the campaign came to an end, Trump himself was sanguine. His ultimate goal, after all, had never been to win. “I can be the most famous man in the world," he had told his aide Sam Nunberg at the outset of the race. His longtime friend Roger Ailes, the former head of Fox News, liked to say that if you want a career in television, first run for president. Now Trump, encouraged by Ailes, was floating rumors about a Trump network. It was a great future. He would come out of this campaign, Trump assured Ailes, with a far more powerful brand and untold opportunities. “This is bigger than I ever dreamed of," he told Ailes a week before the election. “I don’t think about losing, because it isn’t losing. We’ve totally won."
Basically Putin gave him no choice to run and he thought he didn't have a chance to win but he had the entire Russian state backing him up. Which means that trump didn't win after all, he cheated even worse than Nixon did and now the Feds are closing in.
Kind of explains why he treats the position as a total joke, he never wanted to hold it. http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2018/01/michael-wolff-fire-and-fury-book-donald-trump.html
On the afternoon of November 8, 2016, Kellyanne Conway settled into her glass office at Trump Tower. Right up until the last weeks of the race, the campaign headquarters had remained a listless place. All that seemed to distinguish it from a corporate back office were a few posters with right-wing slogans. Conway, the campaign’s manager, was in a remarkably buoyant mood, considering she was about to experience a resounding, if not cataclysmic, defeat. Donald Trump would lose the election — of this she was sure — but he would quite possibly hold the defeat to under six points. That was a substantial victory. As for the looming defeat itself, she shrugged it off: It was Reince Priebus’s fault, not hers. She had spent a good part of the day calling friends and allies in the political world and blaming Priebus, the chairman of the Republican National Committee. Now she briefed some of the television producers and anchors whom she had been carefully courting since joining the Trump campaign — and with whom she had been actively interviewing in the last few weeks, hoping to land a permanent on-air job after the election. Even though the numbers in a few key states had appeared to be changing to Trump’s advantage, neither Conway nor Trump himself nor his son-in-law, Jared Kushner — the effective head of the campaign — ­wavered in their certainty: Their unexpected adventure would soon be over. Not only would Trump not be president, almost everyone in the campaign agreed, he should probably not be. Conveniently, the former conviction meant nobody had to deal with the latter issue. As the campaign came to an end, Trump himself was sanguine. His ultimate goal, after all, had never been to win. “I can be the most famous man in the world," he had told his aide Sam Nunberg at the outset of the race. His longtime friend Roger Ailes, the former head of Fox News, liked to say that if you want a career in television, first run for president. Now Trump, encouraged by Ailes, was floating rumors about a Trump network. It was a great future. He would come out of this campaign, Trump assured Ailes, with a far more powerful brand and untold opportunities. “This is bigger than I ever dreamed of," he told Ailes a week before the election. “I don’t think about losing, because it isn’t losing. We’ve totally won."
Basically Putin gave him no choice to run and he thought he didn't have a chance to win but he had the entire Russian state backing him up. Which means that trump didn't win after all, he cheated even worse than Nixon did and now the Feds are closing in.
He probBly thought he could never win—then he was handed the chance on a siver platter. The Russians knew when they had a dupe. He was exactly what they wanted—a pushover, too stupid for words. Lois
Kind of explains why he treats the position as a total joke, he never wanted to hold it. http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2018/01/michael-wolff-fire-and-fury-book-donald-trump.html
On the afternoon of November 8, 2016, Kellyanne Conway settled into her glass office at Trump Tower. Right up until the last weeks of the race, the campaign headquarters had remained a listless place. All that seemed to distinguish it from a corporate back office were a few posters with right-wing slogans. Conway, the campaign’s manager, was in a remarkably buoyant mood, considering she was about to experience a resounding, if not cataclysmic, defeat. Donald Trump would lose the election — of this she was sure — but he would quite possibly hold the defeat to under six points. That was a substantial victory. As for the looming defeat itself, she shrugged it off: It was Reince Priebus’s fault, not hers. She had spent a good part of the day calling friends and allies in the political world and blaming Priebus, the chairman of the Republican National Committee. Now she briefed some of the television producers and anchors whom she had been carefully courting since joining the Trump campaign — and with whom she had been actively interviewing in the last few weeks, hoping to land a permanent on-air job after the election. Even though the numbers in a few key states had appeared to be changing to Trump’s advantage, neither Conway nor Trump himself nor his son-in-law, Jared Kushner — the effective head of the campaign — ­wavered in their certainty: Their unexpected adventure would soon be over. Not only would Trump not be president, almost everyone in the campaign agreed, he should probably not be. Conveniently, the former conviction meant nobody had to deal with the latter issue. As the campaign came to an end, Trump himself was sanguine. His ultimate goal, after all, had never been to win. “I can be the most famous man in the world," he had told his aide Sam Nunberg at the outset of the race. His longtime friend Roger Ailes, the former head of Fox News, liked to say that if you want a career in television, first run for president. Now Trump, encouraged by Ailes, was floating rumors about a Trump network. It was a great future. He would come out of this campaign, Trump assured Ailes, with a far more powerful brand and untold opportunities. “This is bigger than I ever dreamed of," he told Ailes a week before the election. “I don’t think about losing, because it isn’t losing. We’ve totally won."
Basically Putin gave him no choice to run and he thought he didn't have a chance to win but he had the entire Russian state backing him up. Which means that trump didn't win after all, he cheated even worse than Nixon did and now the Feds are closing in.
He probBly thought he could never win—then he was handed the chance on a siver platter. The Russians knew when they had a dupe. He was exactly what they wanted—a pushover, too stupid for words. Lois They sure did, everyone at the White House thinks he's a child. http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-42579990
The author of a controversial book on Donald Trump says that all his White House aides see him as a "child" who needs "immediate gratification".
This is the idiot who is comparing the size of his nuclear launch "button" with a deranged North Korea dictator.
He probBly thought he could never win—then he was handed the chance on a siver platter. The Russians knew when they had a dupe. He was exactly what they wanted—a pushover, too stupid for words. Lois
It's not just trump, the entire republican party in the US is too stupid for words. - They still deny human created climate change even though more and more of the world is burning up each year... and that's just for starters. - Many still deny evolution. - They still believe in "trickle down" economics even though it has been disproved over and over. - They think you can win a war on terror. - They think you can win a war on drugs. - They think race is a determinant of whether someone is worthy to be an American. - They refuse to accept the responsibility for having a traitor in the White House... even if he only ended up there because he was too friggin' dumb to see what was coming.

Don’t forget
– They think Hillary committed murder
– They think she directly caused the deaths in Benghazi
– They think having anti-abortion judges is more important than have pro-child judges
– They think donating to the Clinton foundation is the same as handing Hillary a bag of cash with a dollar sign on it.

Don't forget -- They think Hillary committed murder -- They think she directly caused the deaths in Benghazi -- They think having anti-abortion judges is more important than have pro-child judges -- They think donating to the Clinton foundation is the same as handing Hillary a bag of cash with a dollar sign on it.
Or that either Bush's were good presidents, the only reason that we still aren't treating W. as the moron he truly is is that republicans went for a total idiot with trump. W. started a war with the wrong country that cost the US many thousands dead or permanently maimed, trillions of dollars and has turned the entire world into a war zone. Or even Reagan, the guy had Alzheimer's while in office and is considered one of the greatest republican presidents of modern times. They actually revere highly diminished mental faculties in the republican party, it allows them to believe the batshit crazy stuff that is the foundation of the party now.
He probBly thought he could never win—then he was handed the chance on a siver platter. The Russians knew when they had a dupe. He was exactly what they wanted—a pushover, too stupid for words. Lois
It's not just trump, the entire republican party in the US is too stupid for words. - They still deny human created climate change even though more and more of the world is burning up each year... and that's just for starters. - Many still deny evolution. - They still believe in "trickle down" economics even though it has been disproved over and over. - They think you can win a war on terror. - They think you can win a war on drugs. - They think race is a determinant of whether someone is worthy to be an American. - They refuse to accept the responsibility for having a traitor in the White House... even if he only ended up there because he was too friggin' dumb to see what was coming. You’re right. Lois

And he’s got the tapes. :ohh:

Mike Allen, Jan 4, 2018 Scoop: Wolff taped interviews with Bannon, top officials https://www.axios.com/scoop-wolff-taped-interviews-with-bannon-top-officials-1515111038-da51faf9-3cb4-411f-ad8a-5270635642d4.html