Intuition

I personally don't believe in premonitions because of personal experience. There have been many times I've had premonitions, and I mean incredibly strong "gut" feelings that something is going to happen... for example, that I'm going to win the lottery. I once woke up one morning with the profound conviction that I was going to meet a woman that day. It was so strong, I was looking over my shoulder all day. I've also had negative premonitions. I used to have strong feelings that my car was going to break down that day, or that a family member was going to die. Nothing ever happened. The time my car DID break down, and the time my brother died of a stroke, were not accompanied by the slightest psychic hint that anything was wrong. So I've learned to pretty much ignore them when I have them.
I think that there is an important distinction between the terms "intuition" and "premonition". "Premonition" pretty much blatantly suggests a supernatural ability to know something (otherwise unpredictable) that will occur in the future. Anything deemed "super"-natural is bullshit. There is only the natural. There is nothing beyond the natural. Some people probably do, also, consider "intuition" to be supernatural. In that interpretation, "intuition" would also be bullshit. But I think that most people think of "intuition" as a good or bad feeling about something, that is much less specific than a "premonition". We can have good or bad feelings about prospective situations, without being aware of the source of those good or bad feelings. That is natural. It is natural, but the minute you start thinking those feelings have any validity, you're on shaky ground. There is no evidence that any feelings before an event predict anything. People just remember the times the feeling seemed to be predictive and forget the times they were completely wrong. Confirmation bias loud and clear. Lois
...Some people probably do, also, consider "intuition" to be supernatural. In that interpretation, "intuition" would also be bullshit. But I think that most people think of "intuition" as a good or bad feeling about something, that is much less specific than a "premonition". We can have good or bad feelings about prospective situations, without being aware of the source of those good or bad feelings. That is natural.
It is natural, but the minute you start thinking those feelings have any validity, you're on shaky ground. Agree.
There is no evidence that any feelings before an event predict anything.
Disagree.
People just remember the times the feeling seemed to be predictive and forget the times they were completely wrong. Confirmation bias loud and clear.
Agree.
...Some people probably do, also, consider "intuition" to be supernatural. In that interpretation, "intuition" would also be bullshit. But I think that most people think of "intuition" as a good or bad feeling about something, that is much less specific than a "premonition". We can have good or bad feelings about prospective situations, without being aware of the source of those good or bad feelings. That is natural.
It is natural, but the minute you start thinking those feelings have any validity, you're on shaky ground. Agree.
There is no evidence that any feelings before an event predict anything.
Disagree. Can you give some examples of this phenomenon? What ferlings do you know about that predicted something?
People just remember the times the feeling seemed to be predictive and forget the times they were completely wrong. Confirmation bias loud and clear.
Agree.
There is no evidence that any feelings before an event predict anything.
Disagree. TimB Can you give some examples of this phenomenon? What ferlings do you know about that predicted something? Lois "Predict" may not be the most precise term, but any organism that is capable of feeling emotions, and has a history of exposure to contingencies (that elicit emotional reactions) within a given stimulus setting, is likely to experience similar emotional reactions when subsequently presented with the same or similar stimuli (prior to an "expected" experience of the historical contingency). e.g., (If you believe that dogs experience emotions) consider Pavlov's dogs when they heard the bell, and their salivation increased (per their conditioning) in "anticipation" of getting some meat, do you not think that they were also experiencing some other feelings (besides excess drooling)?
There is no evidence that any feelings before an event predict anything.
Disagree. TimB Can you give some examples of this phenomenon? What ferlings do you know about that predicted something? Lois "Predict" may not be the most precise term, but any organism that is capable of feeling emotions, and has a history of exposure to contingencies (that elicit emotional reactions) within a given stimulus setting, is likely to experience similar emotional reactions when subsequently presented with the same or similar stimuli (prior to an "expected" experience of the historical contingency). e.g., (If you believe that dogs experience emotions) consider Pavlov's dogs when they heard the bell, and their salivation increased (per their conditioning) in "anticipation" of getting some meat, do you not think that they were also experiencing some other feelings (besides excess drooling)?Well said! I'm looking forward to the response.