Denisovan cave holds remains of three Hominin species

Further excavations of the Siberian cave have uncovered forensic evidence of three distinct Hominin species, Denisovan, Neanderthal and Cro-Magnon that occupied the cave. So far excavators have uncovered not only human and animal remains dating as far back as overt 200,000 years, but other artifacts such as bracelets and weapons. There are 22 distinct layers in this massive cave and these finds will add to DNA evidence previously uncovered that lead Paleoanthropologists to speculate that at least three Homminin species existed simultaneously in time in this area.
http://siberiantimes.com/science/casestudy/features/f0135-first-glimpse-inside-the-siberian-cave-that-holds-the-key-to-mans-origins/
Cap’t Jack

So might there have been some interbreeding so that some modern humans may hold a bit of Denisovian AND Neanderthal DNA?
Another question: This statement was puzzling. “in a significant find in 2008 - in the same layer as the Denisovan bone - was a stone bracelet dated 40,000 years old, but it was made using the technologies specific to a much later time.” How is that possible?

So might there have been some interbreeding so that some modern humans may hold a bit of Denisovian AND Neanderthal DNA? Another question: This statement was puzzling. "in a significant find in 2008 - in the same layer as the Denisovan bone - was a stone bracelet dated 40,000 years old, but it was made using the technologies specific to a much later time." How is that possible?
Burials sometimes dig through older layers, leaving newer objects in those older layers. Why would you expect the layers to be perfectly distributed in a site that was inhabited by man?
So might there have been some interbreeding so that some modern humans may hold a bit of Denisovian AND Neanderthal DNA? Another question: This statement was puzzling. “in a significant find in 2008 - in the same layer as the Denisovan bone - was a stone bracelet dated 40,000 years old, but it was made using the technologies specific to a much later time." How is that possible?
Both good questions that need answering but the 40,000 ya old artifact is well within the scope of Neanderthal technology, or it could have been a re-deposit from flooding or earthquakes. As to DNA deposits I'll bet they do find some cross breeding at least between Neanderthals and Denisovans but they need to excavate all the layers before making a hypothesis. I believe the article mentioned that they had gotten to level 14 with at least 7 more to complete. Then the long, laborious process sorting, identifying extracting DNA and peer reviewed papers before publishing the results, hopefully in our lifetime. The leading Paleoanthropologist, Svante Pääbo is working with the team. Cap't Jack
So might there have been some interbreeding so that some modern humans may hold a bit of Denisovian AND Neanderthal DNA? Another question: This statement was puzzling. "in a significant find in 2008 - in the same layer as the Denisovan bone - was a stone bracelet dated 40,000 years old, but it was made using the technologies specific to a much later time." How is that possible?
Burials sometimes dig through older layers, leaving newer objects in those older layers. Why would you expect the layers to be perfectly distributed in a site that was inhabited by man? Thanks for your attempt at providing information, but not, so much, for your rhetorical question (which I took as being a bit snide). I was asking legitimate questions, as one does when they find something interesting but does not know a lot about the topic.
So might there have been some interbreeding so that some modern humans may hold a bit of Denisovian AND Neanderthal DNA? Another question: This statement was puzzling. “in a significant find in 2008 - in the same layer as the Denisovan bone - was a stone bracelet dated 40,000 years old, but it was made using the technologies specific to a much later time." How is that possible?
Both good questions that need answering but the 40,000 ya old artifact is well within the scope of Neanderthal technology, or it could have been a re-deposit from flooding or earthquakes. As to DNA deposits I'll bet they do find some cross breeding at least between Neanderthals and Denisovans but they need to excavate all the layers before making a hypothesis. I believe the article mentioned that they had gotten to level 14 with at least 7 more to complete. Then the long, laborious process sorting, identifying extracting DNA and peer reviewed papers before publishing the results, hopefully in our lifetime. The leading Paleoanthropologist, Svante Pääbo is working with the team. Cap't Jack
Thanks for your cogent response. I think it is great that there are people who are so rigorously and carefully working to uncover information about our prehistory. I wish it didn't take so long, but I understand why it does.

Along the same line of thinking that several human species may have coexisted is the lasted findings from a much earlier time. http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-32906836

Along the same line of thinking that several human species may have coexisted is the lasted findings from a much earlier time. http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-32906836
I agree, and it seems to confirm the general assumption that different species did interbreed resulting in the variety of genetic traces of other races present today.
So might there have been some interbreeding so that some modern humans may hold a bit of Denisovian AND Neanderthal DNA? Another question: This statement was puzzling. “in a significant find in 2008 - in the same layer as the Denisovan bone - was a stone bracelet dated 40,000 years old, but it was made using the technologies specific to a much later time." How is that possible?
Both good questions that need answering but the 40,000 ya old artifact is well within the scope of Neanderthal technology, or it could have been a re-deposit from flooding or earthquakes. As to DNA deposits I'll bet they do find some cross breeding at least between Neanderthals and Denisovans but they need to excavate all the layers before making a hypothesis. I believe the article mentioned that they had gotten to level 14 with at least 7 more to complete. Then the long, laborious process sorting, identifying extracting DNA and peer reviewed papers before publishing the results, hopefully in our lifetime. The leading Paleoanthropologist, Svante Pääbo is working with the team. Cap't Jack
Its also possible that because of the age of the artifact so pre-dates other known examples, they're hesitant to say that it is as old as it appears without further, more reliable dating methods. Just recently, we've uncovered evidence that farming might have started some 23,000 years ago! Prior to this, it was thought that humans didn't start farming until around 7,500 BC or so. http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/jul/24/archaeologists-find-possible-evidence-of-earliest-human-agriculture

Yeah, that human origins story just keeps on getting more interesting all the time.
Thanks for posting those links. Great stuff to get caught up on.