When was the last time it was this hot?

Recently I was taken to task for an error

CC writes: All the while, there are humans on Earth right now experiencing some of the hottest temperatures humans have ever been subjected to but it don’t mean a thing to your type, ensconced in you hermetically sealed echo-chambers."
As modern humans are now again going to the peak of the Milankovitch Cycle. How do you know that this cycle is hotter than any time in the human past? Carrie Morrill of the National Climatic Data Center explains, "You'd have to go back to the last interglacial [warm period between ice ages] about 125,000 years ago to find temperatures significantly higher than temperatures of today." https://www.climate.gov/news-features/climate-qa/what’s-hottest-earth-has-been-“lately" in September 2014
Mind you I said some and wasn't trying to make any absolute assertion. Guess I'm too worried about the greenhouse gas levels, to obsess about exact temp. figures.
By Andrew Freedman, May 3, 1913 http://www.climatecentral.org/news/the-last-time-co2-was-this-high-humans-didnt-exist-15938 The last time there was this much carbon dioxide (CO2) in the Earth's atmosphere, modern humans didn't exist. Megatoothed sharks prowled the oceans, the world's seas were up to 100 feet higher than they are today, and the global average surface temperature was up to 11°F warmer than it is now. As we near the record for the highest CO2 concentration in human history — 400 parts per million — climate scientists worry about where we were then, and where we're rapidly headed now.
Study: Last time it was this hot, seas rose 20 feet http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2015/07/10/Study-Last-time-it-was-this-hot-seas-rose-20-feet/6181436544927/ By Brooks Hays GAINESVILLE, Fla., July 10, 2015 (UPI) -- Even if the world can stem the flow of carbon emissions and slow the rise of global temperatures, researchers suggest dramatic sea level rise may already be unavoidable. According to a new study published in the journal Science ( http://science.sciencemag.org/content/349/6244/aaa4019.abstract ), the last time the planet featured a run of temperatures this high, the oceans rose a total of 20 feet. ... Researchers at the University of Florida used computer models, combined with data from the geologic record, to calculate sea levels the last time average temperatures rose 1 to 3 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels. The numbers suggest climatic conditions similar to today's precipitated a dramatic rise in sea levels -- 20 to 40 feet higher than current levels -- 400,000 years ago and then again 125,000 years ago. ...
The last time Earth was this hot hippos lived in Britain (that’s 130,000 years ago) January 20, 2016 http://theconversation.com/the-last-time-earth-was-this-hot-hippos-lived-in-britain-thats-130-000-years-ago-53398 The Medieval Warm Period is often cited as the answer. This spell, beginning in roughly 950AD and lasting for three centuries, saw major changes to population centres across the globe. This included the collapse of the Tiwanaku civilisation in South America due to increased aridity, and the colonisation of Greenland by the Vikings. But that doesn’t tell the whole story. Yes, some regions were warmer than in recent years, but others were substantially colder. Across the globe, averaged temperatures then were in fact cooler than today. To reach a point when the Earth was significantly warmer than today we’d need to go back 130,000 years, to a time known as the Eemian. ...
Recently I was taken to task for an error
CC writes: All the while, there are humans on Earth right now experiencing some of the hottest temperatures humans have ever been subjected to but it don’t mean a thing to your type, ensconced in you hermetically sealed echo-chambers."
As modern humans are now again going to the peak of the Milankovitch Cycle. How do you know that this cycle is hotter than any time in the human past? Carrie Morrill of the National Climatic Data Center explains, "You'd have to go back to the last interglacial [warm period between ice ages] about 125,000 years ago to find temperatures significantly higher than temperatures of today." https://www.climate.gov/news-features/climate-qa/what’s-hottest-earth-has-been-“lately" in September 2014
Mind you I said some and wasn't trying to make any absolute assertion. Guess I'm too worried about the greenhouse gas levels, to obsess about exact temp. figures.
What is exactly is the three top things that is worrying you about the greenhouse gasses levels? And what do you see as a method of fixing these top three issues?
The numbers suggest climatic conditions similar to today’s precipitated a dramatic rise in sea levels— 20 to 40 feet higher than current levels—400,000 years ago and then again 125,000 years ago. ...
I downloaded and zoomed in on that peak. It lasted about 20,000 years. Probably longer because of the logrithmic nature of the scale. psik
What is exactly is the three top things that is worrying you about the greenhouse gasses levels? And what do you see as a method of fixing these top three issues?
The number one problem would be the drastic decline in food production. That would trigger human reaction problems of migration and wars. Some sources are implying that we are right at the edge of that now. Sea level rise in Bangladesh will hardly matter if the area is already uninhabitable. Sea level rise is just an easy concept to impress people with. The bottom 10 stories of skyscrapers in New York being underwater just looks so Cool! It is probably too late to do anything so we should just kill off climate deniers. Depending on your source either that last 8 or the last 12 months have all been historical records. My guess is that Global warming has gone from a gradual intermittant increase to a steady moderate increase. The next step will be a rampant rapid increase. The methane clathrates becoming gaseous could do that. psik

Don’t forget water shortages. As glaciers melt not only will sea levels rise but people who depend upon summer ice melting for their fresh water will watch it flow away into aquifers or rivers and end up in oceans, then dry up altogether.

Climate change may soon diminish crop yields
http://www.treehugger.com/climate-change/climate-change-may-soon-diminish-crop-yields.html
psik

Oh yeah, the game is just warming up as they say.

Mapping Drought And Water Stress, From Arizona To Zimbabwe http://ksut.org/post/mapping-drought-and-water-stress-arizona-zimbabwe#stream/0 Originally published on June 21, 2016 12:58 pm California’s prolonged drought has led to millions of dead trees that could make tinder boxes of huge swaths of the state as it heads into fire season. But the American West isn’t the only place coming to grips with chronic drought. The World Resources Institute mapped water stress around the world and found major regions of every inhabited continent have serious issues with water. Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd gets an overview of drought crises around the world from Betsy Otto, director of the World Resources Institute’s Global Water Program.
It is probably too late to do anything so we should just kill off climate deniers. psik
Do you mean, kill them for a source of food? :lol:
It is probably too late to do anything so we should just kill off climate deniers. psik
Do you mean, kill them for a source of food? :lol: Great Idea! I didn't think of that. Torture them slowy to keep them fresh. :lol: psik