Something to follow

Presumably not to grade school students, unless you are teaching “gifted" classes. This seems very advanced, even for gifted grade school age students.
No, religious discussions in a grade school class aren't age appropriate as children lack the capacity for critical thinking at that level. It would be similar to telling a first grader that there is no Santa Claus. It also depends on the cultural environment that surrounds the child. What you can do is introduce the concept of the scientific method, usually by grade four (discuss the basics and projects for science fairs) and reinforce same throughout the the child's time in public ed. What we can do is create the concept of critical thinking. Then it's up to them to decide. I introduce the history of religious beliefs in high school classes, nine through twelve, and allow for free discussions of each but don't actually parse the "holy" books. What I want them to be able to discern for themselves is the evolution of each belief system and how it impacted society, also how society was impacted by the particular belief. What I don't do is subjectively comment on a religion. Remember that the key is "free thought" not "my thought". Letting them figure it out is far better and longer lasting than attempting to blast them out of their beliefs with inflammatory statements and denunciations. That's left for the haranguers behind the pulpit. Cap't Jack Can't Jack
However, free thought includes knowledge about other views and students may have very little knowledge of anything that denies the validity of their religion's tenets. They may be able to "discuss and question" but they will be limited in their ability to do it if their knowledge is limited. That's one way to keep them from learning about what real freethinking is all about. And, there are many ways to give them that information without "attempting to blast them out of their beliefs with inflammatory statements and denunciations." They may never know that the man in the pulpit is haranguing them if they aren't taught how to recognize haranguing and indoctrination. Lois
However, free thought includes knowledge about other views and students may have very little knowledge of anything that denies the validity of their religion’s tenets. They may be able to “discuss and question" but they will be limited in their ability to do it if their knowledge is limited. That’s one way to keep them from learning about what real freethinking is all about. And, there are many ways to give them that information without “attempting to blast them out of their beliefs with inflammatory statements and denunciations." They may never know that the man in the pulpit is haranguing them if they aren’t taught how to recognize haranguing and indoctrination.
But that's exactly what I and my colleagues do Lois, we provide them with other views, religious and secular via discussions of other cultures, their histories AND religious views. The secular views develop out of their exposure to empirical knowledge, e.g. I do a detailed discussion of Darwinian natural selection and it's impact on Georgian and Victorian society. They may extrapolate that to the modern ID v. Evolution controversy often flung at them by their fundie pastors. And yeah, teens know when the sweating man in the pulpit is telling them that their teachers and politicians are going to hell for not being a good Baptist! Cap't Jack
However, free thought includes knowledge about other views and students may have very little knowledge of anything that denies the validity of their religion’s tenets. They may be able to “discuss and question" but they will be limited in their ability to do it if their knowledge is limited. That’s one way to keep them from learning about what real freethinking is all about. And, there are many ways to give them that information without “attempting to blast them out of their beliefs with inflammatory statements and denunciations." They may never know that the man in the pulpit is haranguing them if they aren’t taught how to recognize haranguing and indoctrination.
But that's exactly what I and my colleagues do Lois, we provide them with other views, religious and secular via discussions of other cultures, their histories AND religious views. The secular views develop out of their exposure to empirical knowledge, e.g. I do a detailed discussion of Darwinian natural selection and it's impact on Georgian and Victorian society. They may extrapolate that to the modern ID v. Evolution controversy often flung at them by their fundie pastors. And yeah, teens know when the sweating man in the pulpit is telling them that their teachers and politicians are going to hell for not being a good Baptist! Cap't Jack
Ok! ;-)
I’d be interested in seeing the outline of that if possible. Also do you have anything on Zoroasterism? I have a couple of books on this but haven’t gotten to them as yet. From what I have read in studies of ancient religion Zoroaster is being treated as the beginning of the belief in the One God tradition.
I'm resetting the class as we speak Gary. It starts on Mon. The 18th so I'll see if I can shoot you the outline for the Epic by PM if you like. On Zoroasterism I generally use the text which is now online and I can give you the site if you wish. It's pretty much up to date and includes a supplemental text. Those are the ones I use for the class. Cap't Jack
I'd appreciate it.

Gary, without having to parse all 12 of the tablets in detail I use this site for my class plus excerpts from a supplemental text that ties into the Western Civ. book I use for the class covering prehistory thru the Reformation. Thought you might be able to use this for a quick reference. Also see the Enuma Elish tablets (there are 7 I believe) and the flood story is mentioned there as well only these date to a later period than Gilgamesh.
http://www.mcgoodwin.net/pages/otherbooks/gilgamesh.html
Cap’t Jack

Gary, without having to parse all 12 of the tablets in detail I use this site for my class plus excerpts from a supplemental text that ties into the Western Civ. book I use for the class covering prehistory thru the Reformation. Thought you might be able to use this for a quick reference. Also see the Enuma Elish tablets (there are 7 I believe) and the flood story is mentioned there as well only these date to a later period than Gilgamesh. http://www.mcgoodwin.net/pages/otherbooks/gilgamesh.html Cap't Jack
Thanks.