Schizophrenia Is Caused By Spiritual Oppression And Demonic Attack!!

Schizophrenia 1 of 2 Sermon By Frank Hammond.

Most mental illness is not from physical defects as taught by science, most cases of mental illness is caused from spiritual oppression and demonic attack, due to a number of open doors, most of which the victims had nothing to do with, like generational curses and the sins of the parents, grandparents and or forefathers.
Witchcraft in the bloodline or even family members or relatives who promised them to a demon for power.

all these things should be considered when approaching the mentally ill or emotionally handicap individual.
There are some cases of physical abnormalities that call for a small percent of cases but most have no explanation scientifically for their issues and all science can offer is a so called chemical imbalance…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFsOFV_kGEY&t=354s

I’ve kind of ignored your posts dovesong, but this one is harmful. People with conditions read this stuff and make bad choices. You are not a doctor.

It’s like you can’t go into a crowded theater and yell “Demons are going to burn this place down!” Can you? Well, I guess Dovesong might. But would he get away with it?

Hmmm, seems to me a Public Service Announcement might be called for, since though there is a lot of mystery remaining around Schizophrenia, we do know enough that we don’t need to toss our arms in the air and blame it on god or supernatural demons, when there are so many flesh and blood demons working on driving people crazy.

As for Schizophrenia, Science marches on . . .

 

Biological Origin of Schizophrenia By PAUL GOLDSMITH January 27, 2016

https: //hms _ harvard _ edu/news/biological-origin-schizophrenia

The risk of schizophrenia increases if a person inherits specific variants in a gene related to “synaptic pruning”—the elimination of connections between neurons—according to a study from Harvard Medical School, the Broad Institute and Boston Children’s Hospital. The findings were based on genetic analysis of nearly 65,000 people.

The study represents the first time that the origin of this psychiatric disease has been causally linked to specific gene variants and a biological process.

Get more HMS news here

It also helps explain two decades-old observations: synaptic pruning is particularly active during adolescence, which is the typical period of onset for symptoms of schizophrenia, and the brains of schizophrenic patients tend to show fewer connections between neurons.

The gene, complement component 4 (C4), plays a well-known role in the immune system. It has now been shown to also play a key role in brain development and schizophrenia risk. The insight may allow future therapeutic strategies to be directed at the disorder’s roots, rather than just its symptoms.

The study, which appears online Jan. 27 in Nature, was led by HMS researchers at the Broad Institute’s Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research and Boston Children’s. They include senior author Steven McCarroll, HMS associate professor of genetics and director of genetics for the Stanley Center; Beth Stevens, HMS assistant professor of neurology at Boston Children’s and institute member at the Broad; Michael Carroll, HMS professor of pediatrics at Boston Children’s; and first author Aswin Sekar, an MD-PhD student at HMS.

The study has the potential to reinvigorate translational research on a debilitating disease. Schizophrenia afflicts approximately 1 percent people worldwide and is characterized by hallucinations, emotional withdrawal and a decline in cognitive function. These symptoms most frequently begin in patients when they are teenagers or young adults.

“These results show that it is possible to go from genetic data to a new way of thinking about how a disease develops—something that has been greatly needed.”
First described more than 130 years ago, schizophrenia lacks highly effective treatments and has seen few biological or medical breakthroughs over the past half-century.

SCIENCE WATCH - The roots of mental illness
How much of mental illness can the biology of the brain explain?

By Kirsten Weir

June 2012, Vol 43, No. 6

https: //www _ apa _ org/monitor/2012/06/roots

Diagnosing mental illness isn’t like diagnosing other chronic diseases. Heart disease is identified with the help of blood tests and electrocardiograms. Diabetes is diagnosed by measuring blood glucose levels. But classifying mental illness is a more subjective endeavor. No blood test exists for depression; no X-ray can identify a child at risk of developing bipolar disorder. At least, not yet.

Thanks to new tools in genetics and neuroimaging, scientists are making progress toward deciphering details of the underlying biology of mental disorders. Yet experts disagree on how far we can push this biological model. Are mental illnesses simply physical diseases that happen to strike the brain? Or do these disorders belong to a class all their own?

Eric Kandel, MD, a Nobel Prize laureate and professor of brain science at Columbia University, believes it’s all about biology. “All mental processes are brain processes, and therefore all disorders of mental functioning are biological diseases,” he says. “The brain is the organ of the mind. Where else could [mental illness] be if not in the brain?”

That viewpoint is quickly gaining supporters, thanks in part to Thomas R. Insel, MD, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, who has championed a biological perspective during his tenure at the agency.

To Insel, mental illnesses are no different from heart disease, diabetes or any other chronic illness. All chronic diseases have behavioral components as well as biological components, he says. “The only difference here is that the organ of interest is the brain instead of the heart or pancreas. But the same basic principles apply.”

A new toolkit …
Michael Marshall, MAY 5, 2020

https: //www _ nature _ com/articles/d41586-020-00922-8

The hidden links between mental disorders
Psychiatrists have a dizzying array of diagnoses and not enough treatments. Hunting for the hidden biology underlying mental disorders could help.

… The study tackles a fundamental question that has bothered researchers for more than a century. What are the roots of mental illness?

In the hope of finding an answer, scientists have piled up an enormous amount of data over the past decade, through studies of genes, brain activity and neuroanatomy. They have found evidence that many of the same genes underlie seemingly distinct disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism, and that changes in the brain’s decision-making systems could be involved in many conditions.

Researchers are also drastically rethinking theories of how our brains go wrong. The idea that mental illness can be classified into distinct, discrete categories such as ‘anxiety’ or ‘psychosis’ has been disproved to a large extent. Instead, disorders shade into each other, and there are no hard dividing lines — as Plana-Ripoll’s study so clearly demonstrated.

Now, researchers are trying to understand the biology that underlies this spectrum of psychopathology. …
most cases of mental illness is caused from spiritual oppression and demonic attack,


“Spiritual Oppression”, sure being constant belittling and shit on constantly along with being powerless to change that will tweak any person when subjected to it long enough. But, Schizophrenia takes a few steps beyond that.

“Demonic Attack” What pray tell do you mean with that?

Yipes, let me try that line again:

“Spiritual Oppression”, sure being subjected to belittling and constantly being shit on, along with being powerless to change any of that because of physical, mental, economic constraints will tweak any person when subjected to it long enough.

“Learned helplessness” is what you are talking about when you use the phrase “… being subjected to belittling and constantly being shit on, along with being powerless to change any of that because of physical, mental, economic constraints…”.

That can be a correlate of various mental/emotional pathologies. Schizophrenia is thought to include a genetic component.

My father and brother were diagnosed with schizophrenia. I did not have children, mostly, due to that. But I would say that my father and brother probably had life experiences that promoted learned helplessness before they became schizophrenic. So maybe I could have had children and have prevented them from becoming schizophrenic, if I could have protected them from experiences that foster learned helplessness. IDK.

But I will say that concepts like “spiritual oppression” and “demonic attack” are obfuscating piles of bullshit.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/theory-and-psychopathology/201401/learned-helplessness-correlate-psychosis

My father and brother were diagnosed with schizophrenia. I did not have children, mostly, due to that.
Are you not being harsh to yourself? Unless your father and brother walked naked down Main Street, it isn't right to view them as human defects. Life is no cake walk and, in itself, fundamentally flawed. Humans are the only animal that commit suicide.

Is it harsh to consider that people, (who might well walk naked down Main Street, if not filled full of antipsychotic medication that tends to limit their ability to do much of anything) to have a defect? With severe acute Schizophrenia a person is floridly psychotic.

If you have ever taken a multiple doses of LSD, at once, and had the intense psychosis that follows, then you might have an inkling of what it is like to be Schizophrenic. Except that the psychosis of Schizophrenia does not wear off after several hours. It goes on and on and on.

So f–k your little stupid sayings.

With severe acute Schizophrenia a person is floridly psychotic.
Ok, I guess I stubbed your toe on a rock. I was thinking about treatable hallucination. I just researched what you said. I did not know that it could be that bad. No wonder people like @dovesong05 would believe in demonic possession. Here are a couple of symptoms of two acute cases:
  • Jumping up during the interview to fight off the devil, swinging chairs at pictures, walls, people, etc.

  • Believing part of his brain has been removed and he is already dead. His corpse is being remotely controlled by “"the all seeing eye” from Central Station in Stockholm.

Early in my mental health career, I was an attendant in an in-patient, locked, psychiatric facility. I was assigned to take a patient (a big guy) to another facility to get a Brain Scan. He had Schizophrenia, but was full of strong antipsychotics. When we got to the xray facility, he went up to the desk and said “My name is (redacted for his privacy). I’m here for a brain transplant.”

If that man simply made an error in his choice of words, or if he truly thought he was getting a brain transplant, I do not know.

From age 17 on, my brother was on heavy duty psychoactive medicines. From then until his recent death, there were a handful of times that he was NOT taking those medicines for a week or more. He inevitably became floridly psychotic, and agitated to the point of being dangerous to himself, if not also to others. But filled with psychoactive medicines, he tended to be unquestioningly compliant, and physiologically and mentally slowed down to the point of not being able to succeed in junior college or jobs for any length of time. But the downsides were a better option, than no psychoactive medicines. Even though they also came with a condition that is similar to cerebral palsy. He lived most of his life as a meek, humble little man who drank too much sodas (Pepsi mostly). He never really had a girl friend, although he would have liked to. For the longest time he wanted to work, but it was, eventually no longer possible. I miss him. Oh, he read the Bible every day. I don’t know if he understood much of it, but he would read it cover to cover, no matter how long it took, and then start over.

 

My father and brother were diagnosed with schizophrenia. I did not have children, mostly, due to that. But I would say that my father and brother probably had life experiences that promoted learned helplessness before they became schizophrenic. So maybe I could have had children and have prevented them from becoming schizophrenic, if I could have protected them from experiences that foster learned helplessness.
Tough road.

I wasn’t discounting the genetic component, just saying environmental triggers play a role also. In healthy communities where people don’t get lost and shuffled to the outer limits, the afflicted have a much better chance of healthier outcomes.

 

A few years back heard a story that’s pretty impressive:

For Centuries, A Small Town Has Embraced Strangers With Mental Illness

July 1, 2016

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/07/01/484083305/for-centuries-a-small-town-has-embraced-strangers-with-mental-illness

At the center of Geel, a charming Belgian town less than an hour’s drive from of Antwerp, is a church dedicated to Dymphna, a saint believed to have the power to cure mental disorders. It’s a medieval church with stone arches, spires and a half-built bell tower, and it has inspired an unusual centuries-old practice: For over 700 years, residents of Geel have been accepting people with mental disorders, often very severe mental disorders, into their homes and caring for them.

It isn’t meant to be a treatment or therapy. The people are not called patients, but guests or boarders. They go to Geel and join households to share a life with people who can watch over them. Today, there are about 250 boarders in Geel. One of them is a Flemish man named Luc Ennekans. He’s slim and has green eyes, and he’s 51 years old. NPR’s Lulu Miller went to Geel and met him and his host family there and reported this story for Invisibilia.

Like all of the guests in the town today, Ennekans first went to a public psychiatric hospital in Geel that manages the boarder program. Ennekans saw medical professionals and received treatment and an evaluation. Then he was paired with a household. His hosts, …


Perhaps there is a Spiritual component to good mental health - but it’s the human spirit of love and community that’s the winner.

I wasn’t discounting the genetic component, just saying environmental triggers play a role also.
I believe that there are probably environmental contingencies that play a role in the development of Schizophrenia. So as his big brother, I have always wondered if there was something I did or didn't do that might have helped him to become or to not become Schizophrenic.

I have to live with that perceived failure.

 

I have to live with that perceived failure.
Are you living with the fear that you can become schizophrenic?
Are you living with the fear that you can become schizophrenic?
Not at all. I had some concerns when I was younger. I even pledged to myself that I would never let it happen. (Idk, if it is possible to will one's self to NOT become schizophrenic, but it turned out not to be my fate.) I am too old now. It ain't gonna happen. I could get dementia or Alzheimer's if I live long enough, but not Schizophrenia.
Not at all.
I like that sense of confidence. I have that too, and that means we are protected, by God.
I like that sense of confidence. I have that too, and that means we are protected, by God.
No it just means that I am in an age group in which onset is quite rare. Also, I have taken high powered psychedelics a few times in my life. And I do have an inkling of what psychosis is like from that 1st hand experience. They wore off and I was as sane as I was previously. FWIW. No supernatural entity required. And seriously Sree, you are about as religious as your master, the T rump. So get off your religious kick.

No it just means that I am in an age group in which onset is quite rare. Also, I have taken high powered psychedelics a few times in my life. And I do have an inkling of what psychosis is like from that 1st hand experience. They wore off and I was as sane as I was previously. FWIW. No supernatural entity required.
Don't get cocky. Schizophrenia is not the only way to end up in a fix. As the Chinese say, there is no defense against misfortune (known unknown), getting screwed is ever fresh (unknown unknown). Rumsfeld must have been stealing from Sun Tzu.
And seriously Sree, you are about as religious as your master, the T rump. So get off your religious kick.
I am religious. So is Trump, even though he is not aware of his connection to the Almighty. He walks the path that fate dictates with the assurance of a sleepwalker.

You are a funny one Sree. Funny haha, that is. But I guess a little funny odd, too.

He walks the path that fate dictates with the assurance of a sleepwalker.
I did not realize you had the capacity to understand that the DOTUS does not have free will. But philosophy aside, somebody (besides fate) has got to take the rap for the crap that he does, so I vote it is him that does.

The Depression/Schizophrenia Continuum: Does Cytoskeletal …

Schizophrenia appears to be a disorder of microtubule architecture, depression one of intracellular transport along microtubules and bipolar disorder shares aspects of both schizophrenia and depression. Both current and potential treatments for these disorders target the microtubule cytoskeleton.
What we call science is the systematization of information obtained from nature. Nature has had its own laws from the beginning. Some of these laws are easy to express, while others stretch our understanding and even our sense of logic. Our efforts to understand nature and its workings, that is our production of scientific knowledge, will never end. We may never truly understand the workings of nature, or get close to the real truth. Therefore, it is ridiculous to behave as if we knew all of the workings of nature and to say this is not scientific, it is in conflict with the (known) laws of science. The clearest example of this is when we see the workings of quantum physics in biological structures. When nature is working, it does not know the laws of our science and doesn't even take notice of them. Nature even sometimes winks at us with anomalies. We learn from nature but we cannot impose on nature the laws we have learned from it.
https://www.neuroquantology.com/

 

Microtubule and Microtubule Associated Protein Anomalies in Psychiatric Disease

Francesca Marchisella 1, Eleanor T Coffey 2, Patrik Hollos 1

Abstract

Anomalies in neuronal cell architecture, in particular dendritic complexity and synaptic density changes, are widely observed in the brains of subjects with schizophrenia or mood disorders. The concept that a disturbed microtubule cytoskeleton underlies these abnormalities and disrupts synaptic connectivity is supported by evidence from clinical studies and animal models. Prominent changes in tubulin expression levels are commonly found in disease specific regions such as the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of psychiatric patients. Genetic linkage studies associate tubulin-binding proteins such as the dihydropyrimidinase family with an increased risk to develop schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. For many years, altered immunoreactivity of microtubule associated protein-2 has been a hallmark found in the brains of individuals with schizophrenia. In this review, we present a growing body of evidence that connects a dysfunctional microtubule cytoskeleton with neuropsychiatric illnesses. Findings from animal models are discussed together with clinical data with a particular focus on tubulin post-translational modifications and on microtubule-binding proteins. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27112918/