Recovering from Religion Orgs

The Recovering from Religion organization is a place where people who have left, are leaving or are considering leaving the church to come and discuss their choices and doubts as well as learning how to deal with the new freedoms and ideals of a secular life. Communicating with each other and with already secular people allows for open discussion of all the advantages and pitfalls of this kind of a life changing event. Many times this also entails learning how to survive as a secular person within a religious family/community.
http://recoveringfromreligion.org/
The reason I bring this up is I have seen posters here who are interested in talking with theists who are exploring the idea of non-faith (I avoid using the term “losing faith” as I don’t feel there’s any loss but a gain of freedom and enlightenment) so this may be of interest to them. If you haven’t heard of this group yet I recommend you check them out.
I have a friend who started a group in Tulsa and it’s doing very well now, though for the first 6 or 8 months she had only 2 people show up to each meeting. If you want to get involved in helping others live a better, freer, more satisfying secular life this might be a good match. There may be one in your area or you could start one.
I am thinking about going to the next meeting to help others. My only concern is that I’ve never had faith or been indoctrinated so not sure if that would be a barrier for them or me. I’ve decided to try this, after reading all the wonderful posts in my thread about being bored with atheism (http://www.centerforinquiry.net/forums/viewthread/17199/). I do want to help others find peace in their new secular freedom.
If anyone is already active in this group or another group like this, please comment on the experience, I would appreciate the information.
Thank you!
MzLee

Sounds like a decent idea. One concern I’d have is that some missionaries might sneak in, in the roll of trolls, to try to bring people “back” to the faith.
Occam

From what saw there, they are fully aware of that possibility. I found a group about 20 miles from me and want to learn more, see if I can be helpful in any way.

From what saw there, they are fully aware of that possibility. I found a group about 20 miles from me and want to learn more, see if I can be helpful in any way.
Great, let us know how is goes if you check it out. I, in turn, will report back on my experience. MzLee

I’m involved with such various groups and I think it’s a wonderful idea. While I was raised in Xianity, I didn’t buy into all of it and as an adult, who had the opportunity to study various religions, as well as psychology and other sciences, and slowly lost what little belief I had, thereby becoming more secular as I grew older, I had very few chances of meeting very many secular people. I knew one of my great uncles was an atheist, but I wasn’t allowed to visit him very often, so I didn’t have very much exposure to secularism. I suspect many others raised in religion didn’t have very much exposer either and those on their way out might benefit from knowing more people who have lived secular lives for a lifetime or many years.

Haven’t checked out the website yet, but look forward to doing so. This is interesting because we always hear about the opposite–stories of converts from non-belief to belief; but rarely the opposite (which is true in my case).

My local (closest to me is Tulsa) group is no longer active. I can’t even get a hold of the person who ran it last.
Boo :frowning:

Mz, while I’ve become disenchanted with the Unitarian church because of their move toward theism, there are usually some atheists and agnostics still there. You might go to the closest one to you, check around, and you may find a group or some people who would like to form a humanist/atheist group.
Occam