New laws and labels challenge Military Industrial Complex

A Kink in the Armor
by Derek Cantrell
The President of the United States recently signed into law, a bill requiring military recruits to undergo psychiatric evaluation. The evaluation will be conducted in accordance with the DSM 5. The DSM is the original predecessor to the DSM 5, and was created by the United States Army, to define, classify and treat various psychological disorders. The current DSM 5 is not only recognized by the United States military, but also the American Psychiatric Association.
The DSM 5 defines religious belief as a theme of delusional behavior. While delusional behavior in itself, is not illegal; the idea of allowing those who suffer from delusional behavior to participate in military operations, actions, etc. is nonsensical. A brief assessment by a qualified psychologist or psychiatrist, would likely deem the vast majority of the current military, as suffering from delusional behavior.
The popular religions in the United States are Christianity and Judaism, therefore when referring to American religions, I will be referring to these particular beliefs. While American religions may bring comfort to believers, they also promote the psychology of unquestioning loyalty, even amid obvious inhumanities. For example: God instructed Abraham to kill his own son, God committed infanticide in Egypt at one point in time, and God committed global genocide, omit Noah and a few others. Believers of American religions are taught and encouraged to emulate this genocidal deity, and to follow his leadership without question, lest they succumb to eternal punishment of being burned alive.
American religions also propagate ideas like defending God given freedoms. This indoctrination may seem like a noble gesture, but once the delusion is identified, the propaganda is found to promote nothing more than genocide.
Even if the military was forced to reject believers of American religions and deplete their numbers considerably, I think it would only be a temporary detour ant; but it would slow the military actions, and force them to find a solution. This could mean the sparing of numerous lives, or at worst, the delay of the useless killing of war.
If war was temporarily slowed, due to rejecting believers of American religions, it would also show the direct correlation between American religions and warfare. The United States, as a mass of citizens, are the most religious of the western worlds, and also the most war-driven.
War profiteers propagate American religious psychology, as it is a useful tool to control the masses of non-questioning followers, even in lieu of obvious inhumanities such as genocide. Therefore, rejecting American religions from the military would severely hinder the leaders’ control and propaganda that justifies committing genocide.
We can conclude that there is sufficient evidence to demand the disbanding of military personnel who suffer from belief in American religions. We as a nation, should also demand the disbanding of police officers and political leaders, who suffer from the same theme of delusion. If people want justification for their actions, they should look to scientific method and mathematics. If math seems a radical replacement for religion, consider how many nations have waged, and do wage wars on religious belief vs. how many nations have waged, and do wage wars on arguments over the sum of two plus two.
The DSM 5 has identified a severe problem in our society. This problem is likely the drive behind various inhumanities. Now that it’s identified, the next action is to find proper treatment. While this process may need time to progress, it is only logical to remove delusional personnel from positions in our society that are meant to protect and guide us.
The original manuscript can be found at issuu.com/nolen-two-hundred
I would be delighted with feedback at nolenthebeckoning@gmail.com or this forum

A Kink in the Armor by Derek Cantrell The President of the United States recently signed into law, a bill requiring military recruits to undergo psychiatric evaluation. The evaluation will be conducted in accordance with the DSM 5. The DSM is the original predecessor to the DSM 5, and was created by the United States Army, to define, classify and treat various psychological disorders.
Funny that, reminds me of something in "Alice's Restaurant Massacree" about eight minutes into the thing http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m57gzA2JCcM&t=8m05s

Derek Cantrell presents a false premise. The DSM 5 exempts religious beliefs as delusion. Note this excerpt from the glossary definition: “… The belief is not ordinarily accepted by other members of the person’s culture or subculture …”
A delusion that is a part of a psychotic disorder is not the same as a faith belief. (Although both contradict clear evidence.) You could load the Pope up with anti-psychotic meds, and he would still believe that Jesus is God.
Thus the military will not disqualify entrants based on religious beliefs, alone. (This would also be unconstitutional, though that’s another issue.)
So, nice try, but you have to remember that “You can have anything you want at Alice’s Restaurant (EXCEPTIN’ Alice).”

Derek Cantrell presents a false premise. The DSM 5 exempts religious beliefs as delusion. Note this excerpt from the glossary definition: "... The belief is not ordinarily accepted by other members of the person's culture or subculture ..." A delusion that is a part of a psychotic disorder is not the same as a faith belief. (Although both contradict clear evidence.) You could load the Pope up with anti-psychotic meds, and he would still believe that Jesus is God. Thus the military will not disqualify entrants based on religious beliefs, alone. (This would also be unconstitutional, though that's another issue.) So, nice try, but you have to remember that "You can have anything you want at Alice's Restaurant (EXCEPTIN' Alice)."
Mass delusion is still nothing more than mass delusion. So come on and drink the kool aid...everyone else is. As far as I know the definition you're referring to, is in the DSM IV, not 5. Times they are a changing and there's no room in psychological sciences for carpenter zombies.
Derek Cantrell presents a false premise. The DSM 5 exempts religious beliefs as delusion. Note this excerpt from the glossary definition: "... The belief is not ordinarily accepted by other members of the person's culture or subculture ..." A delusion that is a part of a psychotic disorder is not the same as a faith belief. (Although both contradict clear evidence.) You could load the Pope up with anti-psychotic meds, and he would still believe that Jesus is God. Thus the military will not disqualify entrants based on religious beliefs, alone. (This would also be unconstitutional, though that's another issue.) So, nice try, but you have to remember that "You can have anything you want at Alice's Restaurant (EXCEPTIN' Alice)."
Although insulin shock was devastatingly dangerous in the past, modern insulin and better understanding of metabolism makes for much safer Insulin Coma Therapy (ICT) Though it's not practiced commonly in the U.S., it can be noted that ICT was an effective treatment on patients who suffered from delusion. Perhaps we should consider using a modern and safe form of ICT on the religious. You can laugh it off, but when you consider the role religious belief plays in violence, genocide and war, past and present, you can acknowledge that we're a species that act irrationally and often base the acts on mass delusion At this point, it's probably time to stop laughing and attempt to awaken those from inaccurate correlations and outright disregard for facts and proof. There's no reason to believe the Earth is less than 10,000 years old, there's no reason to worship a god who has a past record of committing infanticide and genocide. There's absolutely no reason to condone war based on such thoughts or to govern ourselves based on these ancient beliefs and principles. It's time to grow up and accept responsibility for our actions in stead of offering "God's will" as an excuse to execute inhumanities. If masses of people wish to continue war and torture, because their insane god condones it, perhaps involuntary ICT should be viewed as a viable option to advance our species. I'm not sure the Pope would be impervious to psycho-treatment. If you were to electroshock him to erase his memory of god and place him in a non-religious environment, I personally believe he would lose his belief in Christ forever.
Derek Cantrell presents a false premise. The DSM 5 exempts religious beliefs as delusion. Note this excerpt from the glossary definition: "... The belief is not ordinarily accepted by other members of the person's culture or subculture ..." A delusion that is a part of a psychotic disorder is not the same as a faith belief. (Although both contradict clear evidence.) You could load the Pope up with anti-psychotic meds, and he would still believe that Jesus is God. Thus the military will not disqualify entrants based on religious beliefs, alone. (This would also be unconstitutional, though that's another issue.) So, nice try, but you have to remember that "You can have anything you want at Alice's Restaurant (EXCEPTIN' Alice)."
Although insulin shock was devastatingly dangerous in the past, modern insulin and better understanding of metabolism makes for much safer Insulin Coma Therapy (ICT) Though it's not practiced commonly in the U.S., it can be noted that ICT was an effective treatment on patients who suffered from delusion. Perhaps we should consider using a modern and safe form of ICT on the religious. You can laugh it off, but when you consider the role religious belief plays in violence, genocide and war, past and present, you can acknowledge that we're a species that act irrationally and often base the acts on mass delusion At this point, it's probably time to stop laughing and attempt to awaken those from inaccurate correlations and outright disregard for facts and proof. There's no reason to believe the Earth is less than 10,000 years old, there's no reason to worship a god who has a past record of committing infanticide and genocide. There's absolutely no reason to condone war based on such thoughts or to govern ourselves based on these ancient beliefs and principles. It's time to grow up and accept responsibility for our actions in stead of offering "God's will" as an excuse to execute inhumanities. If masses of people wish to continue war and torture, because their insane god condones it, perhaps involuntary ICT should be viewed as a viable option to advance our species. I'm not sure the Pope would be impervious to psycho-treatment. If you were to electroshock him to erase his memory of god and place him in a non-religious environment, I personally believe he would lose his belief in Christ forever. I'm sure you realize in our age of information, current religious are diluting into folklore like the countless religions before them.

If they weed out all the religious nuts from the military, who will be left to kill and maim?
I hope they do some weeding among the top officers, too.
Lois

If they weed out all the religios nuts from the military, who will be left to kill and maim? Lois
Well, Stalin seemed to have no problem.....

C’mon folks, we all know killing is fun.
George Carlin said it best.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPxi5wzmPRA

If they weed out all the religios nuts from the military, who will be left to kill and maim? I hope they do some weeding among the top officers, too. Lois
HR 203 actually requires ALL military personnel to undergo annual psychiatric treatment. The highest military position is held by Barrack Obama, so H.R. 203 requires everyone from the U.S. President, down to enlistees.
Derek Cantrell presents a false premise. The DSM 5 exempts religious beliefs as delusion. Note this excerpt from the glossary definition: "... The belief is not ordinarily accepted by other members of the person's culture or subculture ..." A delusion that is a part of a psychotic disorder is not the same as a faith belief. (Although both contradict clear evidence.) You could load the Pope up with anti-psychotic meds, and he would still believe that Jesus is God. Thus the military will not disqualify entrants based on religious beliefs, alone. (This would also be unconstitutional, though that's another issue.) So, nice try, but you have to remember that "You can have anything you want at Alice's Restaurant (EXCEPTIN' Alice)."
Mass delusion is still nothing more than mass delusion. So come on and drink the kool aid...everyone else is. As far as I know the definition you're referring to, is in the DSM IV, not 5. Times they are a changing and there's no room in psychological sciences for carpenter zombies. Some people mention the Constitution, like it's okay to wage genocide as long as your religion condones it. We have a right to bear arms, but we don't allow convicted murderers and rapists carry pistols, nor do we let the common public own rocket propelled grenades. Just because the Constitution gives a particular freedom, it also allows for that freedom to be modified in specific cases, therefore, we absolutely should not allow people who suffer from delusion, or mass delusion, to carry fully automatic weapons or explosives, with intent to detonate them on other (most often delusional) people.
Derek Cantrell presents a false premise. The DSM 5 exempts religious beliefs as delusion. Note this excerpt from the glossary definition: "... The belief is not ordinarily accepted by other members of the person's culture or subculture ..." A delusion that is a part of a psychotic disorder is not the same as a faith belief. (Although both contradict clear evidence.) You could load the Pope up with anti-psychotic meds, and he would still believe that Jesus is God. Thus the military will not disqualify entrants based on religious beliefs, alone. (This would also be unconstitutional, though that's another issue.) So, nice try, but you have to remember that "You can have anything you want at Alice's Restaurant (EXCEPTIN' Alice)."
Mass delusion is still nothing more than mass delusion. So come on and drink the kool aid...everyone else is. As far as I know the definition you're referring to, is in the DSM IV, not 5. Times they are a changing and there's no room in psychological sciences for carpenter zombies. Sorry, your rant may be in the right place but your reasoning is not. Take this sentence from the DSM 5 Glossary of technical terms: "...The belief is not one ordinarily accepted by other members of the person's culture or subculture..." (e.g., it is not an article of religious faith) So Psychologists and Psychiatrists are not going to disqualify people from eligibility for military service due to standard religious beliefs. Also Congress shall make no laws effecting the establishment of religion. (One of those pesky Bill of rights rules.) IOW there cannot be a law that results in someone's not being allowed in the military simply due to their religion. BTW, I tend to avoid Kool-Aid, yours or anyone else's.
Derek Cantrell presents a false premise. The DSM 5 exempts religious beliefs as delusion. Note this excerpt from the glossary definition: "... The belief is not ordinarily accepted by other members of the person's culture or subculture ..." A delusion that is a part of a psychotic disorder is not the same as a faith belief. (Although both contradict clear evidence.) You could load the Pope up with anti-psychotic meds, and he would still believe that Jesus is God. Thus the military will not disqualify entrants based on religious beliefs, alone. (This would also be unconstitutional, though that's another issue.) So, nice try, but you have to remember that "You can have anything you want at Alice's Restaurant (EXCEPTIN' Alice)."
Mass delusion is still nothing more than mass delusion. So come on and drink the kool aid...everyone else is. As far as I know the definition you're referring to, is in the DSM IV, not 5. Times they are a changing and there's no room in psychological sciences for carpenter zombies. Sorry, your rant may be in the right place but your reasoning is not... This is how the DSM 5 differs from the DSM IV, when it comes to delusion. You will find that the new definition encompasses religious belief as a "Theme of delusion." This insert can be found at: http://imperfectcognitions.blogspot.com/2013/06/delusions-in-dsm-5.html How has the definition of delusions changed in the DSM 5? Here are some first impressions. In the DSM-IV (Glossary) delusions were defined as follows: Delusion. A false belief based on incorrect inference about external reality that is firmly sustained despite what almost everyone else believes and despite what constitutes incontrovertible and obvious proof or evidence to the contrary. The belief is not one ordinarily accepted by other members of the person's culture or subculture (e.g., it is not an article of religious faith). When a false belief involves a value judgment, it is regarded as a delusion only when the judgment is so extreme as to defy credibility. This is how delusions are described in the DSM-5 (Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders): Delusions are fixed beliefs that are not amenable to change in light of conflicting evidence. Their content may include a variety of themes (e.g. persecutory, referential, somatic, religious, grandiose).[…] Delusions are deemed bizarre if they are clearly implausible and not understandable to same-culture peers and do not derive from ordinary life experiences. […] The distinction between a delusion and a strongly held idea is sometimes difficult to make and depends in part on the degree of conviction with which the belief is held despite clear or reasonable contradictory evidence regarding its veracity.
If they weed out all the religios nuts from the military, who will be left to kill and maim? Lois
Well, Stalin seemed to have no problem..... What happened to him and his political philosophy? Lois
Derek Cantrell presents a false premise. The DSM 5 exempts religious beliefs as delusion. Note this excerpt from the glossary definition: "... The belief is not ordinarily accepted by other members of the person's culture or subculture ..." A delusion that is a part of a psychotic disorder is not the same as a faith belief. (Although both contradict clear evidence.) You could load the Pope up with anti-psychotic meds, and he would still believe that Jesus is God. Thus the military will not disqualify entrants based on religious beliefs, alone. (This would also be unconstitutional, though that's another issue.) So, nice try, but you have to remember that "You can have anything you want at Alice's Restaurant (EXCEPTIN' Alice)."
Mass delusion is still nothing more than mass delusion. So come on and drink the kool aid...everyone else is. As far as I know the definition you're referring to, is in the DSM IV, not 5. Times they are a changing and there's no room in psychological sciences for carpenter zombies. Sorry, your rant may be in the right place but your reasoning is not... This is how the DSM 5 differs from the DSM IV, when it comes to delusion. You will find that the new definition encompasses religious belief as a "Theme of delusion." This insert can be found at: http://imperfectcognitions.blogspot.com/2013/06/delusions-in-dsm-5.html How has the definition of delusions changed in the DSM 5? Here are some first impressions. In the DSM-IV (Glossary) delusions were defined as follows: Delusion. A false belief based on incorrect inference about external reality that is firmly sustained despite what almost everyone else believes and despite what constitutes incontrovertible and obvious proof or evidence to the contrary. The belief is not one ordinarily accepted by other members of the person's culture or subculture (e.g., it is not an article of religious faith). When a false belief involves a value judgment, it is regarded as a delusion only when the judgment is so extreme as to defy credibility. This is how delusions are described in the DSM-5 (Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders): Delusions are fixed beliefs that are not amenable to change in light of conflicting evidence. Their content may include a variety of themes (e.g. persecutory, referential, somatic, religious, grandiose).[…] Delusions are deemed bizarre if they are clearly implausible and not understandable to same-culture peers and do not derive from ordinary life experiences. […] The distinction between a delusion and a strongly held idea is sometimes difficult to make and depends in part on the degree of conviction with which the belief is held despite clear or reasonable contradictory evidence regarding its veracity. You provided the glossary definition from the DSM-IV, but not the glossary definition from the DSM-5. http://imperfectcognitions.blogspot.com/2013/08/delusion-in-dsm-v-response-to-lisa.html
If they weed out all the religios nuts from the military, who will be left to kill and maim? Lois
Well, Stalin seemed to have no problem..... What happened to him and his political philosophy? LoisI'm not sure of your point; are you arguing the same ought to happen in the USA?