Music.

A piece never intended for public performance has become one of this composers most popular works.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCLZwo3TZ3A

Beethoven never wrote a “Moonlight Sonata” he did write a “Sonata Quasi Una Fantasia” (“A Sonata in the form of a Fantasy”). 4 years after Beethoven died someone said this movement reminded them of Moonlight on Lake Lucerne and the name stuck.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nT7_IZPHHb0

Something someone said made me realize, I’m not my father, and that’s a good thing. My father was very intolerant of anything that he didn’t like, and was vocal about it. I have learned that other people don’t like the same things that I like and can accept it, My father could not. He believed that if anyone didn’t like exactly the same things he did, there was something wrong with them.
I was just listening to this,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykOlUhQhfkw
And my wife asked “How can you listen to hours of that”, and I realized that she wasn’t appreciating it like I was. I had been listening to some Debussy piano works before that. I noticed that in spite of her saying that I should continue listening, she didn’t object when I didn’t put it back on. I play piano a little, not anywhere as good as this person, but I can appreciate the skill and ability of his playing and the beauty of the pieces being played.

That first piece is one of my favorite scenes, but I don’t think it qualifies as music.

That first piece is one of my favorite scenes, but I don't think it qualifies as music.
I would guess that you are referencing the movie 10, but you are correct that the composer never intended it to be played as music, in the sense of being preformed in a concert. That being said, I was in my college orchestra, and we preformed this piece in a concert, it sounded pretty good.

Breakup, the link in your first post takes me to Dinner at The Restaurant at the End of the Universe.
Great scene, but no music.

Breakup, the link in your first post takes me to Dinner at The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. Great scene, but no music.
Sorry, wrong link, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r30D3SW4OVw
And my wife asked "How can you listen to hours of that", and I realized that she wasn't appreciating it like I was.
I could listen to classical all day, and have. Hadn't heard these in a while. Sound great through headphones. thanks for sharing. One reason my wife and I have remained married so long is we have almost identical taste in music.
I would guess that you are referencing the movie 10, but you are correct that the composer never intended it to be played as music, in the sense of being preformed in a concert. That being said, I was in my college orchestra, and we preformed this piece in a concert, it sounded pretty good.
I'd imagine that your snare drummers weren't too happy about it. Great piece of music, though. Ravel is one of the all-time great orchestrators, and he does an excellent job of using the orchestra to change the texture and increase intensity for each iteration of the themes. That's really hard to do.
One reason my wife and I have remained married so long is we have almost identical taste in music.
My wife and I have been married for 37 years and we share the appreciation of most music, but there are a few exceptions. She will only listen to a little classical piano before she has heard enough, and she will not let me listen to Jazz at all, when we are together.
I would guess that you are referencing the movie 10, but you are correct that the composer never intended it to be played as music, in the sense of being preformed in a concert. That being said, I was in my college orchestra, and we preformed this piece in a concert, it sounded pretty good.
I'd imagine that your snare drummers weren't too happy about it. Great piece of music, though. Ravel is one of the all-time great orchestrators, and he does an excellent job of using the orchestra to change the texture and increase intensity for each iteration of the themes. That's really hard to do. One of the most difficult things about playing this piece was the control needed. As the conductor said, you needed to be very careful to not play too loud too soon because you always needed to have some room to get louder till the end. That was especially difficult for the trumpet section (which was where I was) because the trumpet was a naturally loud instrument, unless it was very carefully controlled.
One reason my wife and I have remained married so long is we have almost identical taste in music.
My wife and I have been married for 37 years and we share the appreciation of most music, but there are a few exceptions. She will only listen to a little classical piano before she has heard enough, and she will not let me listen to Jazz at all, when we are together. This is speculative, but I believe that women are more lyric oriented than pure instrumental music. Try a few selctions of Joni Mitchell's album "Both Sides Now". A vituoso display of a jazz singer. Dina Krall may also be suitable. I base this on my wife's preferences. She also does not like most instrumetal jazz, but if performed by a vocalist in addition to great musicianship of the accompanying group, I am confident that some jazz will be irresistible. Pat Metheny is also a favorite of hers, due to his soaring guitar sounds. He as well as Jaco Pastorius, David Brecker used to back-up Joni Mitchel on several of her albums. The album "Hejira" and especially Joni's composition of "Black Crow" comes to mind. Good stuff, all around. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDSJzfoURmU P.s. try this on her. It is a live concert rendition of the classic "Estate" by Michel Petrucciani, with Steve Gadd on drums.. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPuiDrXp2XA His perfomance is spine chilling and a perfect example of tension and release, a romantic masterpiece.

Great stuff. I detect strong jazz affection there. :smiley:
Although, I doubt that women prefer more lyrics oriented music than men. We’re all human.
Speaking of lyrics, here’s a video that I’ve seen making the Facebook rounds:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1rmo3fKeveo
I don’t know this guy’s story at all. A great singer, and that Mongolian singing style is something many people never get exposed to.

This is speculative, but I believe that women are more lyric oriented than pure instrumental music.
My wife does like Saxophone, so I can find almost any genre with a Sax as the featured instrument and she will listen, and the Sax seems to be well represented in Jazz.
This is speculative, but I believe that women are more lyric oriented than pure instrumental music.
My wife does like Saxophone, so I can find almost any genre with a Sax as the featured instrument and she will listen, and the Sax seems to be well represented in Jazz. I proposed that because I believe women are more socially oriented (subjective) than men and when they can combine a story with music it seemed to have greater emotional impact. I used to Dj and found the most response from women when playing jazz vocals. Perhaps a right/left brain function? This is not set in stone of course. There are great female jazz musicians also. Comes to mind Tal Wilkenfeld. A studio recording. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hcd7zYM97hA&list=PLFE01FCD3EE72D4A8&index=7 and a glimpse of sheer emotional in her live concert solo on "Cause we ended as Lovers" (note the title). Even Jeff Beck was blown away by her solo. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VC02wGj5gPw and another version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blp7hPFaIfU As an ex-bassplayer I am astounded at the technical mastery and compositional maturity of her play. I think she was 19 at the time.... :bug:
Great stuff. I detect strong jazz affection there. :D Although, I doubt that women prefer more lyrics oriented music than men. We're all human. Speaking of lyrics, here's a video that I've seen making the Facebook rounds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1rmo3fKeveo I don't know this guy's story at all. A great singer, and that Mongolian singing style is something many people never get exposed to.
Wow, what resonance. I had never heard anything like this before. 2 strings and a voice!

I’m not sure what the gender bias is on instrumental music in general is. Female jazz musicians that get (relatively) famous are the minority, at least excluding singers. Same with rock bands. Orchestras - I’m not sure. There is some gender bias on specific instruments, but overall - I don’t really know if orchestras tend to be overwhelmingly male, excluding other social factors which encourage more boys to excel at music than girls in many cultures.
Tal is great - that clip with Jeff Beck is pretty awesome. :slight_smile:
Speaking of resonance and female musicians:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4BJ3wng6Mk
Actually somewhat related to the Mongolian singer, that kind of singing is extremely hard to control. Sounds melodic, but very, very technically advanced.

There was one major orchestra that would not consider a female musician until recently, It was a left over from an age of male dominance, hopefully we are growing out of it now. I’m afraid it might take a few more years for women to be fully equal with men in all areas, in music there are still gender roles that are enforced by unwritten rules. It seems that culture is rather slow to evolve.

Then there is the counter tenor, or male soprano. It doesn’t seem to work the other way for some reason.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6BlH-ZC5P0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWD8d_YL30o&list=RDHWD8d_YL30o#t=79
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7XH-58eB8c
It isn’t always the little guy that can do this,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CEaMaEb6HIo

Then there is the counter tenor, or male soprano. It doesn't seem to work the other way for some reason. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6BlH-ZC5P0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWD8d_YL30o&list=RDHWD8d_YL30o#t=79 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7XH-58eB8c It isn't always the little guy that can do this, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CEaMaEb6HIo
Good stuff. I read somewhere that music (fleeting harmonic melodies) is the opposite of architecture (permanent harmonic construction) in the spectrum of Art forms. I thought that was a profound observation. Fortunately we are able to record spontaneous improvisations on a theme, or these little gems would be lost forever. Interstingly, Bach already allowed for "improvisational freedom" in some of his compositions.