Music anyone?

OK, so I’ve hung around a bit and it seems “General” is General - So I hope it’s safe to open a topic like this :wink:

 

Who is “into” music? A little more than what’s the top “Like” on some list?

Such as - I’m a Prog fan and have been before I knew what it was. And still finding interesting niches.

I also play trumpet and keyboards some which led me to some certainly different types of music that are out there.

If any interest you might find some youtubes under my name.

 

Does anyone else play anything?

Interests?

 

 

Goto Entertainment sub forum.

 

Sorry - Overlooked that one.

I did hit it once or twice, just forgot :wink:

 

I played drums and guitar when I was younger but haven’t touched either in years. I was OK at both but a little better at drums IMO. Was in a metal band with some friends as a teen.

Always been a big music fan but now I’m pushing 40 and don’t keep up with the newer stuff much anymore. I like a lot of things from most genres except maybe jazz, blues and country.

I listen to Disco, 70s Soft Rock, Yacht Rock, Smooth Jazz, Old School R&B, some modern R&B, a little bit of Rap, Motown, Philly, EDM, Dance, Trance, Prance… Classical, Swing, Classic Soul, 60s, a little bit of 50s, Blues, some Bluegrass, very little Country. Basically, I like a little bit of everything and a whole lot of Soul.

My french side;, the " classical French singers" of the sixties and the seventies, of good quality, as Léo Ferré, Jacque Brel, and so…

My american side, Joan Baez, Dylan, Woodie Guthrie, Pete Seghers, and some western and country. For instance,Ode to Billie Joe, by Bobbie Gentry is near perfection.

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=ode+to+billie+joe&oq=ode+to+billie+joe&aqs=chrome…69i57j46j0l4j0i395j46i395j0i395l2.4232j1j15&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

 

 

Since you asked, and it sure beats thinking about the monstrosity in Washington.

I’ve got a funny relationship with music. My childhood home was immersed in it and radio WFMT was always turned on. My dad played multiple instruments, belonged to the Chicago Musicians Union, played cello in quartet, base cello in orchestra, Hammond organ as solo performer in dinner clubs. Chicago’s classic classical station WFMT got to know him by voice, because when he called in regularly to ‘name that tune’ by its first couple bars, because when he got through, he never got it wrong. (from being there in person I know he was also never wrong when didn’t get through) Five kids, the man had, and not a one of us possesses any musical talent beyond a deep appreciation for it.

Dad hated rock’n roll and I liked it, in teen years learning to love it, Almond Brothers, Supertramp, Pink Floyd, Loggins & Messina, country rock, old time western, hippy music and with time Grateful Dead. The only real musical instrument I possess is my ears and backbone, and when the music is right I’m a dancer, the kind that the band recognizes because its the music I climb into, and since all bands are natural show offs, let them know you’re really tuned in and appreciative of what they are doing, and they will get lit up and return the favor by taking the music into higher realms of energy and expression.

It’s how I’ve become convinced that music is the most beautiful pure religious expression humans are capable. It can definitely take you into the heavens and bring you back down to earth and land you with smile on your face and warm tingle in your body, in way nothing else can. Few things in life are better, IMHO. But during my day to days, I don’t have music on in the background, and most the time if I’m listening to anything, it usually a book on tape.

 

Oh and thank you Freddie Mercury for Bohemian Rhapsody, and Elton John for Funeral For a Friend, they finally put a crack in Dad’s absolute rejection of the rock’n roll.

Since you asked, and it sure beats thinking about the monstrosity in Washington.
One of the main reasons I started this one. After so much of that kind of stuff, I'm apt to search for TeleTubbies

My dad insisted all the kids (I’m youngest of 5) had to take up some kind of music. I started trumpet in the early 70s and play to this day … ok maybe it’s been a few months - been busy. Been through HS orchestra, jazz band, marching band, garage band … etc - I PROUDLY wore the label “Band Fag” (though the sexual orientation connotation wasn’t quite correct) - something the “jocks” tried to throw around as a pejorative.

I find that most of the music I like can’t be found on the radio. So I have to seek out new (to me) artists through other avenues. Pandora has been great for this (As well as Bandhub - mentioned below)

I hooked up with a buddy in mid-90s that we still get together about once a month or so. We’ve gone to open mic nights - guitar and trumpet - original music, almost always. We’ve been in and out of a few bands. Last one was really cool, able to integrate keys and trumpet. In some instances both at the same time (at least overlapping). There used to be a website “Bandhub” that was really neat - getting musicians from all over the world to collaborate on covers and originals, and in a fun / casual way. (some collabs available on youtube) The collab sites I’ve hit since are not as casual and fun.

Yes - Music is magical. There is nothing like playing live and getting into “the groove” with the rest of the band.

 

Thanks for all the comments!

My dad insisted all the kids (I’m youngest of 5) had to take up some kind of music. I started trumpet in the early 70s and play to this day … ok maybe it’s been a few months – been busy. Been through HS orchestra, jazz band, marching band, garage band … etc – I PROUDLY wore the label “Band Fag” (though the sexual orientation connotation wasn’t quite correct) – something the “jocks” tried to throw around as a pejorative.
There's a theory that forcing kids to play music will be good for them later on. I'm skeptical about that, but for some kids it can turn into something bigger that opens doors for them. Everyone is impressed when they hear you can play an instrument so at least you got that going for you.
There’s a theory that forcing kids to play music will be good for them later on. I’m skeptical about that, but for some kids it can turn into something bigger that opens doors for them. Everyone is impressed when they hear you can play an instrument so at least you got that going for you.
Getting involved in any activity will be good for kids. It will open doors that they otherwise wouldn't know is even there. Music, sports, hiking, camping, 4H ...

… In Moderation! They don’t have to be The Best at Everything.

I hated the practice and lessons. Some of the school organized activities were OK. Later on the After-concert/show parties were pretty good. But I think most of all it gives one a sense of community and belonging. A lot of great friends - and even met my to-be wife through band.

@thatoneguy, how do you feel about people who like to learn? As one who had to endure about a year of piano lessons, that only taught me I don’t have any musical skills and then I was released - I can appreciate how easy it just to poop-poop music lessons. But, then as so often happens in life, we realize there’s more going on than just what that little snot nosed kid was aware of.

So, I did a quickie google search, since I knew I would find all sorts of articles about connections between brain development and music, I was not disappointed:

Children and Music: Benefits of Music in Child Development ... www.brighthorizons.com › family-resources › music-a...

Learn the benefits of music and read parenting tips for helping children enjoy … an instrument can improve mathematical learning and even increase SAT scores. … Even young infants sway, bounce, or move their hands in response to music. … and songs about familiar things like toys, animals, play activities, and people.
5 Ways Music Helps Your Child’s Brain Development
rockandrolldaycare.com › 5-ways-music-helps-childs-b…

Here are five ways that music improves your child’s brain development. … that singing helps people learn a foreign language and that music can help bring back … done by Brigham YoungUniversity indicates that engaging infants with music can … increase in their IQ than another group who waited a year for music lessons.
7 ways music benefits your child’s brain | Parenting
www.greatschools.org › Parenting › Arts

Oct 29, 2020 — Recent research underscores how playing an instrument (sooner than … Such cuts to music education are particularly ironic given the growing body of … mastering a musical instrument improves the way the human brain … The correlation may stem from particular ways that music “challenges” young minds.
Musical benefits | Learning Potential
www.learningpotential.gov.au › articles › musical-bene…

Apr 17, 2020 — Brain growth Studies in neuroscience show that music can enhance brain … Studies also show that young children who participate in music classes … helping them to remember things even while their minds are busy with …
7 Benefits of Music for Children While Growing Up | Budsies …
www.budsies.com › Home › Guest Blog

Jul 6, 2017 — This helps them develop social skills, such as how to relate with people, how to work in a team, leadership, and discipline, and how to appreciate …
Keep Your Brain Young with Music | Johns Hopkins Medicine
www.hopkinsmedicine.org › wellness-and-prevention

Music can be medicine for your mind, with benefits from memory … “There are few things that stimulate the brain the way music does,” says one Johns Hopkins … concentrate might be distracting to someone else, and what helps one person …
The Benefits of Music Education | Parenting… | PBS KIDS for …
www.pbs.org › … › The Benefits of Music Education

Linking familiar songs to new information can also help imprint information on young minds,” the group claims. This relationship between music and language …
20 Important Benefits of Music In Our Schools - NAfME
nafme.org › 20-important-benefits-of-music-in-our-sch…

Jul 21, 2014 — Read about important benefits of music and how music education offers … with music, and songs can help imprint information on young minds. … The new economy has created more artistic careers, and these jobs may grow …
Children’s brains develop faster with music training - USC News
news.usc.edu › childrens-brains-develop-faster-with-mu…

Jun 20, 2016 — Music instruction appears to accelerate brain development in young … conductor Gustavo Dudamel had been in when he was growing up in Venezuela. … in his students helping each other to perform in an authentic way.

About 164,000,000 results (0.55 seconds)

 

So, I did a quickie google search, since I knew I would find all sorts of articles about connections between brain development and music, I was not disappointed:
Anecdotally, I excelled in middle school typing class. The teacher said music students tended to do better because of rhythm and coordination. Yes TYPING class - with Typewriters! :D (late '70s)

I started playing/learning in 4th grade. In 6th grade was a school program that allowed students to go at their own pace on the primary subjects. I raced ahead in math and science. I don’t know if it was just “me”, or if music helped. I didn’t have a “control me” to compare too.

 

Music is a truly universal language

Many animals respond to music, some use music to attract mates.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bHObbpndA0

@thatoneguy, how do you feel about people who like to learn? As one who had to endure about a year of piano lessons, that only taught me I don’t have any musical skills and then I was released – I can appreciate how easy it just to poop-poop music lessons. But, then as so often happens in life, we realize there’s more going on than just what that little snot nosed kid was aware of.
Wanting to learn how to play an instrument is all good. I was motivated to learn 2 instruments, and did that. Was it fun -- kind of. Did it do anything for me besides being fun -- not really.

As for learning music’s positive effect on kids, any link seems tenuous at best.

Getting involved in any activity will be good for kids.
I wouldn't say any activity but close enough.

[quote=“mrmhead, post:1, topic:7741”]
Does anyone else play anything?

Old retired bassplayer here

Interests?

Jazz /fusion.

Pat Metheny is my all time favorite romantic guitar player and his compositions are modern mini concertos. His music keeps you breathlessly sitting on the edge of your seat.

I usually like studio work better than live performance, but with Metheny, the rapport he establishes with his audience is magical.

This may illustrate (play over a big sound system or earphones to hear the subtleties of the arrangements. Keep the Title in mind while listening.

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For an encore…

Resistance is futile… :astonished:

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One of my many favourites:

[quote=“mriana, post:18, topic:7741, full:true”]

One of my many favourites:

Wow, mriana, I didn’t think you had it in you… :thinking:

That was brutal … :dizzy_face:

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@mriana Certainly not what I expected :wink:

Thanks

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