Mexico's Latest Solution to the Drug War!

Exorcisms!]

"We believe that behind all these big and structural evils there is a dark agent and his name is The Demon. That is why the Lord wants to have here a ministry of exorcism and liberation, for the fight against the Devil," says Father Carlos Triana, a priest, and an exorcist, in Mexico City. "As much as we believe that the Devil was behind Adolf Hitler, possessing and directing him, we also believe that he (the Devil) is here behind the drug cartels." Mexico's exorcists say there is unprecedented demand for their services. Some are even not taking new cases, as they are having to exorcise demons almost every day.
What a nightmare situation. You've got ruthless drug cartels who're brutally murdering people in a manner most calculated to scare the locals, so that they won't alert the authorities to what's going on, and you've got a population terrified, and resorting to not only ineffective means like exorcisms, but they're also now praying to a "Saint Death" (sort of a pagan god that people have made an unofficial saint of the Catholic church). Meanwhile, nobody seems to be talking about doing the only effective thing: decriminalization/legalization of illegal drugs.

That’s just incredible. I am flabbergasted that in the 21st Century people still believe in demonic possession. This shows one of the dangers of religion: instead of tackling the real problem, which you identified, people are wasting their energy chasing delusions. The Roman Catholic Church has a long way to go before it will be an overall force for good in this world.

I am not sure if catholicism ever encourage pseudo-science or not, but if we look at Christianity (even religion) as a whole, The relationship between education and faith is not that simple.
While some historians had always regarded the Draper-White thesis as oversimplifying and distorting a complex relationship, in the late twentieth century it underwent a more systematic reevaluation. The result is the growing recognition among historians of science that the relationship of religion and science has been much more positive than is sometimes thought. Although popular images of controversy continue to exemplify the supposed hostility of Christianity to new scientific theories, studies have shown that Christianity has often nurtured and encouraged scientific endeavour, while at other times the two have co-existed without either tension or attempts at harmonization. If Galileo and the Scopes trial come to mind as examples of conflict, they were the exceptions rather than the rule

but while Brooke’s view [religion and science relationship is complex] has gained widespread acceptance among professional historians of science, the traditional view remains strong elsewhere, not least in the popular mind
Science & Religion: A Historical Introduction. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press
page ix

A link for the above can be seen here (sorry if it is long, but it was being marked as spam every other way I tried ) :frowning:
http://books.google.ae/books?id=weOOCfiDhDcC&pg=PR9&dq=The+result+is+the+growing+recognition+among+historians+of+science&hl=en&sa=X&ei=mIWoUsrGMoKF4ASyt4D4Ag&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=The result is the growing recognition among historians of science&f=false

But then again, I dont know much about how the church has been attacking drugs.
I am not even christian so I dont really care much either.
This is more of a criminology question.
A good book on this is
http://books.google.ae/books?id=ft0r5H1tviUC&printsec=frontcover&dq=comparative+and+transnational+criminology&hl=en&sa=X&ei=6IuoUpaDOMKY4wT234CYCg&ved=0CC0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=comparative and transnational criminology&f=false

But then again, I dont know much about how the church has been attacking drugs.
I am not even christian so I dont really care much either.
This is more of a criminology question.
A good book on this is
http://books.google.ae/books?id=ft0r5H1tviUC&printsec=frontcover&dq=comparative+and+transnational+criminology&hl=en&sa=X&ei=6IuoUpaDOMKY4wT234CYCg&ved=0CC0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=comparative and transnational criminology&f=false
If I remember correctly, one of its chapters (9 maybe?) also briefly discusses some aspects of religious criminal law as well.