Ivan Karamazov

I read The Brothers Karamazov comic years ago when I was a Christian and I really like it. I didn’t really pay attention on Ivan because I was on Alexei’s side.
Now, I’m an atheist and I decided to check the novel. I find that I have too many things in common with Ivan and it pains me.
I think Dostoevsky saw Ivan’s compassion that extended to the rejection of God would only cause more harm than good. But from my own experience, what people call as Christian love is twisted. It is love without empathy and compassion, which, in my opinion, is not love.
Ivan’s weakness is too often used by believers as a license to treat others, whom they consider as sinners, like an ass in the name of Christian love.
What do you think of this character and the novel. What we, as humanists, can learn from it?

Great question. I’m would need to review the book to answer that though, and that’s a lot of book. Could you be more specific. Maybe link to a particular passage?

Gosh I think I had to read that in high school. so I’m no help there.
But I liked how you phrased this!

But from my own experience, what people call as Christian love is twisted. It is love without empathy and compassion, which, in my opinion, is not love.
PS. Welcome to CFI

I tried reading that book. I made it about half way through. That was because I was forcing myself because I felt
some contrived need to understand a Russian Classic. I wanted to connect with the prestige of Dostoevsky.
I have heard tell that it must be read in Russian to really “feel” the book. I can see that. For people who like these kinds of books.

I tried reading that book. I made it about half way through. That was because I was forcing myself because I felt some contrived need to understand a Russian Classic. I wanted to connect with the prestige of Dostoevsky. I have heard tell that it must be read in Russian to really "feel" the book. I can see that. For people who like these kinds of books.
I imagine the long freezing Russian winter nights helped the reading quite a bit.

Yes, I think it’s better if we understand the context, Russian history, etc.

Great question. I’m would need to review the book to answer that though, and that’s a lot of book. Could you be more specific. Maybe link to a particular passage?
Here is the rebellion chapter: https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/d/dostoyevsky/d72b/chapter35.html Here is the famous Parable of the Grand inquisitor: https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/d/dostoyevsky/d72b/chapter36.html
I don't want harmony. From love for humanity I don't want it. I would rather be left with the unavenged suffering. I would rather remain with my unavenged suffering and unsatisfied indignation, even if I were wrong. Besides, too high a price is asked for harmony; it's beyond our means to pay so much to enter on it. And so I hasten to give back my entrance ticket, and if I am an honest man I am bound to give it back as soon as possible. And that I am doing. It's not God that I don't accept, Alyosha, only I most respectfully return him the ticket.

Never read the book. But, I am understanding that Russia may be looked at in Russia and that area as a more Christian country than the United States today. What is that your view on that?

Never read the book. But, I am understanding that Russia may be looked at in Russia and that area as a more Christian country than the United States today. What is that your view on that?
I'm not too familiar with Russian history, culture and religion. From what I understand, Brothers Karamazov seemed to predict the disaster of communist regime...

Anyone interested in the Brothers Karamazov without having to read the whole book should try this comprehensive site.
http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/brothersk/