Map of the galaxy

I’m trying to get a handle on just the local stars and planets (local to us). Some apps and sites offer a grid system with us in the (0,0,0) cube, but sites that list stars and objects don’t appear to acknowledge those. Most talk about how far away things are and where they appear in the night sky, but when we look up, that’s a 2-dimensional view of the 3D galaxy. And the earth is always moving, so saying a star is in a constellation doesn’t tell me a direction from that 0,0,0 point.

I can’t quite bring all this information together. Maybe it’s just a matter of study, but even then, it seems like there is some reference material that I’m missing.

@lausten

Any help?

http://stars.chromeexperiments.com/

 

Or if you’re looking for a Sky Map so you can step outside and find a star:

http://www.skymaps.com/

The map is updated monthly. I use this regularly for my summertime sky gazing.

The chromeexperiments is great for perspective, but once you zoom out, you can’t read what the objects are. Also, no planets once you zoom out past this solar system.

skymaps looks like it is for looking up. I want to see where a star like Rigel is in relation to us and our ecliptic. From what I know now, I would have to calculate how the earth is tilted on a particular day when the Orion constellation is visible. Down to the hour really.

Edit: With a little luck, I zoomed out and found Betelgeuse, top left in Orion. But, then you have center on that, and it zooms into a detail of it, zoom out again, and right on the edge of their data, when the words are just tiny white dots, I saw Rigel, the left foot of Orion. After that, it’s just a bunch of dots, no more names. I didn’t see that they explained what plane they are calling the “middle” of their picture, or if the degrees of the circle they show is a standard system. But, hey, progress.