Oh dear, what are they doing to eggs?

A couple days ago I cracked an egg for breakfast and it was a twin, two yolk sacks.
Don’t recall ever seeing that. Now, with four eggs remaining in the dozen, five have turned out to be “twins”
something weird and disconcerting even though yolks looked okay, not enough to stop us from eating them,
but you can bet we aren’t buying that brand again.
What little fertility magic are they pumping these babies up on?

Hickman's out of Buckeye, AZ (Texas Lic #299558) The box promises No Antibiotics, No Hormones… sell by Jul 26, 2015 P2030 184 12:19 pk15
hmmm, no hormones? then why all the twins? What other 'tricks' do these producers have up their sleeves ? :sick:

Very interesting. You may want to read this
“While there are some breeds of hens capable of producing double yolks, most double-yolked eggs we discover inside the cartons on our refrigerator shelves are simply biological practice swings. The majority of these double-yolk eggs are produced when a hen is still quite young and her body is adapting to egg-laying.”
http://wonderopolis.org/wonder/two-yolks/
And here is someone who had nearly the identical experience that you had with an explanation of why it may have happened.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1248133/Eggs-actly-ARE-chances-double-yoker.html
Always fun to learn something new even if its not going to save the world :slight_smile:
Maybe you should give Hickman’s a second chance.

Over the years I’ve seen a few double yoke eggs, it doesn’t happen often but it does happen. I think you just got lucky with so many in one dozen.

I heard that the price of eggs has gone up due to an outbreak of bird flu, but I doubt that has anything to do with it. Also, I noticed the other day, that some celebrity was campaigning against the apparently common practice, these days, of keeping hens in tiny, highly constraining, individually enclosed cages their entire lives. Again, this probably has nothing to do with double yolks.
But double yolks, seems like a good thing to me. (The yolk is the best part, IMO.) I would be in favor of selecting out any hens and roosters that tend to produce double yolks and breed those babies. I say go for triple yolk producers. (But I wouldn’t keep them penned up their entire lives, even if it meant more yolks and even though it probably does mean cheaper eggs.)

Very interesting. You may want to read this "While there are some breeds of hens capable of producing double yolks, most double-yolked eggs we discover inside the cartons on our refrigerator shelves are simply biological practice swings. The majority of these double-yolk eggs are produced when a hen is still quite young and her body is adapting to egg-laying." http://wonderopolis.org/wonder/two-yolks/ Cute article, I really do like egg-sploring :coolsmile: myself. thanks And here is someone who had nearly the identical experience that you had with an explanation of why it may have happened. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1248133/Eggs-actly-ARE-chances-double-yoker.html Always fun to learn something new even if its not going to save the world :-) Oh yeah, that's why I'm such a documentary freak, the world is full of fun surprises and fascinating connections Maybe you should give Hickman's a second chance. You know, they were "JUMBO" eggs, and I've never purchased "jumbo" I don't even do "ex-large" usually grabbing the "large" eggs. Maybe I should occasionally purchase Hickman's "JUMBO"s and do some random surveying. They also say young chicks tend to do, the twins, and hey, yah can't knock young chics - so I'm enlightened.
Holy chicken poop, that's like the second interesting article I've read at that dreaded DailyMail in as many days. Now I'm really am getting spooked ;-P
DailyMail.com ... Take Ms Exon's eggs (6 double eggs in a six pack). If the probability of a single egg, chosen at random, having two yolks is one in 1,000, the chances of getting an entire box is indeed equal to 1,000 to the power of six. … In fact, the key words here are 'chosen entirely at random'. Because eggs are not chosen entirely at random. For a start, all the eggs in this box probably came from the same flock. Flocks of hens tend to be all of roughly the same age, in this case ones that have only just started laying. This increases the likelihood of their laying multi-yolked eggs and decreases the odds from one in 1,000 to, maybe, one in 30 or so. Even so, we would still expect a box containing six double-yolked eggs to be a rare occurrence. If the odds are 1:30 for a single egg, chosen at random, having two yolks, the chances of getting six are 729 million to one against. In the UK we would only expect to see about one box like this crop up every 12 months. But, again, the key words are 'chosen at random'. Because this is almost certainly not what has happened here. Eggs are sorted, by hand and machine, by size and weight. Double-yolked eggs are bigger and heavier than normal ones and hence are selected to be sold as 'extra large'. Now the 'extraordinary coincidence' begins to melt away, and it is easy to see how Ms Exon really should not have been so spooked by what she saw. First, her eggs almost certainly came from a flock with a propensity for laying double-yolked eggs. Then further selection happened to pick out the largest eggs. In fact, rather than one quintillion to one against, the true odds were probably more like a few tens of thousands to one against or even lower. Eggs with two yolks used to be seen as a bad - or sometimes - good omen. ... Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1248133/Eggs-actly-ARE-chances-double-yoker.html#ixzz3gMtit5wC

Oh, I just read MacGyver’s link http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1248133/Eggs-actly-ARE-chances-double-yoker.html, that suggests double yolks come from a glitch in the series of hormones that signal when the yolk should be produced. I suppose it could be that there is something about how hens are being raised (or even given hormones artificially?) in order to increase production that could lead to more of such glitches.
Or, as our more superstitious ancestors would assume, it is just a foreboding of the end times.

Oh, I just read MacGyver's link http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1248133/Eggs-actly-ARE-chances-double-yoker.html, that suggests double yolks come from a glitch in the series of hormones that signal when the yolk should be produced. I suppose it could be that there is something about how hens are being raised (or even given hormones artificially?) in order to increase production that could lead to more of such glitches. Or, as our more superstitious ancestors would assume, it is just a foreboding of the end times.
I'm sure that's what it is, Tim. Run for the hills. Lois
Oh, I just read MacGyver's link http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1248133/Eggs-actly-ARE-chances-double-yoker.html, that suggests double yolks come from a glitch in the series of hormones that signal when the yolk should be produced. I suppose it could be that there is something about how hens are being raised (or even given hormones artificially?) in order to increase production that could lead to more of such glitches. Or, as our more superstitious ancestors would assume, it is just a foreboding of the end times.
I'm sure that's what it is, Tim. Run for the hills. Lois Run for the hills and take some double yolk egg laying hens with you.

I wonder if the ‘spin-the-egg’ to see if it is cooked/uncooked works for double yolks? Hmm… Now that I think about it, I believe the effect would be more pronounced as both yolks would ‘bunch up’ during the spin.
Anyway…
Take care,
Derek

If double-yolk eggs were fertilized they would be fraternal twins.
Lois

If double-yolk eggs were fertilized they would be fraternal twins. Lois
That's exactly right. They are two different ova inhabiting the same shell and they would have been fertilized by two different sperm just like human fraternal twins. They would be no more genetically alike than any two brothers and sisters.